A Handbook of Cultural Economics

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Ruth Towse
Edward Elgar Publishing, Jan 1, 2003 - Business & Economics - 494 pages
3 Reviews
'Ruth Towse is to be congratulated on assembling such a high quality range of writers on cultural economics and on orchestrating their contributions so expertly. From anthropology and auctions through copyright and superstars to visual arts and welfar
 

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Contents

Anthropology of art
15
Applied welfare economics
20
Art auctions
32
Art markets
40
Art prices
57
Artistic freedom
64
Artists labour markets
69
Artists rights
76
Information goods
263
International trade
269
Internet culture
276
Internet economics
281
Management of the arts
287
Marketing the arts
293
Media economics
301
Motion pictures
306

Awards
81
Ballet
85
Baumols cost disease
91
Broadcasting
102
Cinema
114
Contingent valuation
119
Copyright
132
Corporate arts sponsorship
143
Costs of production
152
Criticism in the arts
161
Cultural capital
166
Cultural industries
170
Cultural statistics
177
Cultural sustainability
183
Cultural tourism
187
Dealers in art
194
Demand
201
Digitalization
214
Economic impact of the arts
224
Festivals
232
Fixed book price
237
Gift economy
243
Globalization
248
Heritage
255
Museums
315
Music business
321
Nonprofit organizations
331
Opera
342
Orchestras
349
Participation
356
Performance indicators
366
Principalagent analysis
373
Public choice
379
Public support
389
Publishing
399
Regulation
408
Sociology of art
415
Superstars
431
Support for artists
437
Taste formation
445
Tax concessions
451
Television
458
Value of culture
465
Visual arts
470
Welfare economics
476
Index
483
Copyright

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Page 20 - The pecuniary recompence, therefore, of those who exercise them in this manner, must be sufficient, not only to pay for the time, labour, and expense of acquiring the talents, but for the discredit which attends the employment of them as the means of subsistence. The exorbitant rewards of players, opera-singers, opera-dancers, etc.
Page 20 - It seems absurd at first sight that we should despise their persons, and yet reward their talents with the most profuse liberality. While we do the one, however, we must of necessity do the other. Should the public opinion or prejudice ever alter with regard to such occupations, their pecuniary recompense would quickly diminish.
Page 20 - Should the public opinion or prejudice ever alter with regard to such occupations, their pecuniary recompense would quickly diminish. More people would apply to them, and the competition would quickly reduce the price of their labour. Such talents, though far from being common, are by no means so rare as is imagined. Many people possess them in great perfection, who disdain to make this use of them; and many more are capable of acquiring them, if anything could be made honourably by them.

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