A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON GRASSES AND FORAGE PLANTS

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Page 100 - When properly managed, the number of cattle which can be kept in good condition on an acre of Lucerne, during the whole season, exceeds belief. It is no sooner mown than it pushes out fresh shoots, and wonderful as the growth of clover sometimes is, in a field that has been lately mown, that of Lucerne is far more rapid.
Page 100 - It is no sooner mown than it pushes out fresh shoots ; and, wonderful as the growth of clover sometimes is, in a field that has been lately mown, that of lucerne is far more rapid. Lucerne will last for many years, shooting its roots — tough and fibrous almost as those of liquorice — downwards for nourishment, till they are altogether out of the reach of drought. In the dryest and most sultry weather, when every blade of grass droops for want of moisture, lucerne holds...
Page 45 - ... grass may be mowed any time from July to October. * * * This I wondered at, but, viewing some of it attentively, I think I have found the reason of it. When it is grown about three feet high, it then falls down, but doth not rot like other grass when lodged ; in a little time after it is thus fallen down, at every joint it puts forth a new branch. Now, to maintain this young brood of suckers there must be a plentiful course of sap conveyed up through the main stem or straw ; by this means the...
Page 228 - ... pursued, till many others were interested, while the collections, if properly named, would do much to disseminate a higher knowledge of the exhaustless riches of this class of plants. " The royal rose, the tulip's glow, The jasmine's gold, are fair to see ; But while the graceful grasses grow, 0, gather them for me...
Page 94 - The stems of red clover are ascending, somewhat hairy ; leaflets oval or obovate, often notched at the end, and marked on the upper side with a pale spot ; heads ovate, and set directly upon the stalk, instead of upon branches. This species is regarded as by far the most important of the whole genus for the practical purposes of agriculture.
Page 52 - ... herbaceous, lower one convex on the back, or compressed, keeled, five to nine nerved ; awned or bristle-pointed from below the tip; upper palea at length adhering to the groove of the oblong grain; fringed on the keel; stamens three; styles attached below the apex of the ovary. The grasses of this genus are coarse, with large spikelets, somewhat drooping generally when ripe.
Page 27 - The mode of culture is very simple. The grass is pulled up by hand and placed in a hole about a foot deep, and the sand pressed down about it. These holes are dug about one foot and a half apart. The spring is the usual time of planting, though many do this work in the fall or winter. The roots of the grass from which it soon covers the ground, are very long.' I have noticed them ten feet, and I suppose upon high hills they extend down into wet sand.
Page 143 - ... hold this proposition to be indisputable : that any soil will yield a larger and more nutritious crop if sown with several kinds of nutritious grasses, than when sown with only one or two species. Indeed, it is a fact well established, by careful experiment, that a mixture of only two or three species of grasses and clover will produce a less amount of hay than can be obtained by sowing a larger number of species together. There may be some exceptions to this rule, as in cases where the yield...
Page 29 - A farmer, of much practical knowledge of this subject, says : " Since the cattle have been kept from the beaches, by the act of the Legislature of 1826, the grass and shrubs have sprung up of their own accord, and have, in a great measure, in the westerly part of the Cape, accomplished what was intended to be done by planting grass. It is of no use to plant grass on the high parts of the beach. Plant on the lowest parts and they will raise, while the highest places, over which the grass will spread,...
Page 18 - It is a good permanent grass, standing our climate as well as any other, and consequently well suited to our pastures, in which it should be fed close ; for, if allowed to grow up to seed, the cattle refuse it ; and this seems to show that it is not so much relished by stock as some of the other pasture grasses. The fact that cattle eat any grass greedily in the spring, is no proof of its excellence or nutritious qualities ; since then all grasses are tender and full of juice, and many varieties...

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