Design of Steel Bridges: Theory and Practice for the Use of Civil Engineers and Students

Front Cover
McGraw-Hill book Company, Incorporated, 1915 - Bridges - 472 pages
 

Contents

Distribution of Live Load
21
Impact and Vertical Vibrations
22
Wind Pressure
25
Lateral Vibrations
27
Centrifugal Force 11 Braking and Traction Forces
29
Snow Load
30
Temperature Changes
31
General CHAPTER II
32
Determination of Reactions
33
Influence Lines
37
Moments and Shears from Moving Concentrated Loads in Spans without Floorbeams
44
Maximum Moment in Short Spans without Floorbeams
48
Influence Lines for Spans without Floorbeams
49
Moments and Shears from Dead Load in Spans with Floorbeams
50
Moments and Reactions from Live load in Spans with Floorbeams
52
Shears from Uniform Live Load in Spans with Floorbeams
53
Shears from Moving Concentrated Loads in Spans with Floorbeams
55
Floorbeam and Intermediate PierReactions
56
Engine Diagrams and WheelLoad Tables
57
Equivalent Uniform Loads
62
Tables of Moments and Shears
63
CHAPTER IV
73
Methods of Calculation
74
Trusses with Parallel Chords
76
Warren Truss without Verticals
79
Influence Lines for Trusses with Parallel Chords
80
Stress Coefficients for Trusses with Parallel Chords
84
Trusses with Polygonal Top Chord
85
Influence Lines for Trusses with Polygonal Chord
90
Example for Trusses with Polygonal Chord
93
Trusses with Subdivided Panels
97
Influence Lines for Trusses with Subdivided Panels
99
Example for Truss with Subdivided Panels
100
Stress Coefficients for Trusses with Polygonal Chord
102
Trusses of Skew Spans
103
CHAPTER V
105
Lateral System between Straight Chords
106
Lateral System between Polygonal Chords
108
KSystem of Laterals
109
Indirect Wind Stresses in Bottom Chords
110
Stability against Lateral Forces
111
Stresses due to Eccentric Loading
112
Stresses from Braking Force
113
Stresses in End Sway Frames of Deck Spans
115
Classification of Bridges
117
IBeam Bridges
132
BEAM AND PLATE GIRDEr Bridges
143
Plate Girder Bridges
149
Stiffeners
157
Horizontal Flange Rivets
158
Vertical Flange Rivets 16 Web Splice
160
Flange Splices
165
Bracing 19 Bearings
166
CHAPTER IX
167
Number of Trusses 3 Distance between Trusses 4 General Principles of Truss Design
169
Riveted and PinConnected Trusses 6 Parallel and Polygonal Chords 7 Heights of Trusses
170
Web System
171
Shape of Polygonal Chord
172
Panel Length
173
General Principles for the Design of Truss Members
175
Sections for Top Chord
177
Sections for Bottom Chord
180
Sections for Diagonals
181
Sections for Verticals
182
Eyebars
183
Bracing of Truss Spans
185
Lateral System between the Loaded Chords
187
End Sway Bracing and Portals
188
Intermediate Sway Bracing
189
Bearings
190
Gusset Plates of Riveted Trusses 25 Chord Splices 26 Pin Connections
193
Size of Pins 28 Bending and Shearing Stresses in Pins
194
Pin Packing
197
Calculation of Moments and Shears on Pins
200
Pin Plates
203
Latticing of Compression Numbers
204
Camber
207
PAGE
208
CHAPTER X
209
Provision for SuperElevation
215
Distance between Tracks on Curves
220
149
222
153
223
155
224
Expansion
256
Further Information on Viaducts
259
CHAPTER XIII
260
Flooring
261
166
262
Calculation of Stresses in Columns
263
Stresses Due to Wind and Centrifugal Force
264
Stresses Due to Braking Force
266
Combined Stresses
267
Anchorages
268
Weights of Elevated Railroads
269
Additional Information on Elevated Railroads also Subways
271
CHAPTER XIV
273
CenterBearing Swing Bridge
276
RimBearing Swing Bridge
278
Turning Device
279
End Lift
280
Types and Principal Dimensions of Girders and Trusses of Swing Bridges
281
Arrangement of Floor and Center Cross Girder
282
Dead Load Stresses
283
Live Load Stresses
284
167
286
Load on Center Pivot and Center Wedges
293
Wind Stresses
294
INFLUENCE LINES FOR SWING SPAN See Art 13 Chap
294
Calculation of Deflections
296
Power Required to Operate Movable Bridges
298
Motors
300
Weights of Movable Bridges
301
Locomotive Turntables
305
Additional Information on Swing Bridges
309
CHAPTER XV
312
Dead and Live Load Stresses in the TwoHinged Arch
319
Temperature Stresses in the TwoHinged Arch
327
Approximate Calculations of the TwoHinged Arch
328
Example for the Calculation of Stresses in a TwoHinged Arch
335
Wind Stresses in the Two and ThreeHinged Arch
339
Stresses Due to Braking Force
343
Stresses Due to Yielding of Foundations
346
Types of Arch Bridges
347
169
349
Principal Dimensions of Arch Trusses
350
Bents and Hangers
351
Floor System and Bracing
352
Steel Weights of Arch Bridges
354
Additional Information on Arch Bridges
366
CHAPTER XVI
367
Live Loads and Permissible Unit Stresses
369
170
371
Examples of Cantilever Bridges
372
171
379
Examples of Long Span Highway Bridges in New York
383
Designs for a North River Suspension Bridge New York
392
General
396
Influence Coefficient
399
CHAPTER III
404
B Design of Cantilever Bridges
418
172
418
173
421
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON LONG SPAN BRIDGES
423
B Actual Pressure of Foundations in Structural Work
430
140
433
175
434
D Tables
436
180
445
F Riveting
448
141
450
H Specifications
454
INDEX
463
143
464
MOMENTS AND SHEARS IN SIMPLE SPANS PAGE V XV xix xxiii 2 Influence Lines for Spans without Floorbeams
467
Moments and Shears from Uniform Dead Load in Spans without Floorbeams 4 Moments and Shears from Uniform Live Load in Spans without Floo...
468
181
469
207
470
221
472
1
10
25
30
31
39
14333
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 461 - Pins shall be long enough to insure a full bearing of all the parts connected upon the turned body of the pin. They shall be secured by chambered nuts or be provided with washers if solid nuts are used. The screw ends shall be long enough to admit of burring the threads.
Page 459 - The flanges of plate girders shall be connected to the web with a sufficient number of rivets to transfer the total shear at any point in a distance equal to the effective depth of the girder at that point combined with any load that is applied directly on the flange.
Page 461 - If splice plates are not in direct contact with the parts which they connect, rivets shall be used. on each side of the joint in excess of the number required in the case of direct contact to the extent of one-third of that number for each intervening plate.
Page 458 - If the alternate stresses-occur in succession during the passage of one train, as in stiff counters, each stress shall be increased by 50 per cent of the smaller. The connections shall in all cases be proportioned for the sum of the stresses.
Page 462 - Where d = clear distance, between stiffeners of flange angles. t — thickness of web. s = shear per sq. in. The stiffeners at ends and at points of concentrated loads shall be proportioned by the formula of paragraph 16, the effective length being assumed as one-half the depth of girders.
Page 461 - J-in. thick shall be used under the nut. Bolts shall not be used in place of rivets except by special permission. Heads and nuts shall be hexagonal.
Page 458 - Plate girders shall be proportioned either by the moment of. inertia of their net section; or by assuming that the flanges are concentrated at their centers of gravity; in which case one-eighth of the gross section of the web, if properly spliced, may be used as flange section.
Page 461 - ... for each 10 ft. shall be made for all bridge structures. Efficient means shall be provided to prevent excessive motion at any one point. (60) Spans of 80 ft. and over resting on masonry shall have turned rollers or rockers at one end; and those of less length shall be arranged to slide on smooth surfaces. These expansion bearings shall be designed to permit motion in one direction only.
Page 459 - Pitch of Rivets. — The minimum distance between centers of rivet holes shall be three diameters of the rivet; but the distance shall preferably be not less than 3 in.
Page 459 - ... respectively. The maximum distance from any edge shall be eight times the thickness of the plate, but shall not exceed 6 in.

Bibliographic information