The Works: The Industrial Architecture of the United States

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Oxford University Press, 1999 - Architecture - 347 pages
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In this study, Betsy Hunter Bradley sets forth the terms of the type of analysis that industrial architecture demands. She explores the rationale behind the pragmatic design and functional beauty of American factory buildings and "the works" complexes in which they often stand. While tracing the important developments in industrial architecture over a one-hundred-year period, she demonstrates that as the United States became an industrialized nation, the goals pursued in industrial architecture remained straightforward and constant even as the means to achieve them changed. Generously illustrated with historic views, The Works will be a valuable resource for historians, architects, and historic preservationists, as well as for anyone interested in industrial architecture generally.
 

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Contents

THE AMERICAN MANUFACTURING WORKS
1
ENGINEERED FACTORIES
85
Engineering Considerations
109
Materials of Construction
133
Factory Walls
161
Factory Roofs
177
THE AESTHETICS OF INDUSTRIAL ARCHITECTURE
201
Factories as Architecture
225
The Terminology of Industrial Architecture
259
Notes
271
Bibliography
299
Index
333
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About the author (1999)

Betsy Hunter Bradley, Former Teacher in the Historic Preservation Program, Youngstown State University.

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