Youth's History of Kentucky: From the Earliest Discoveries and Settlements to the Year 1898

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Courier-Journal Job Printing Company, 1898 - Kentucky - 367 pages
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Page 215 - We have met the enemy and they are ours; two ships, two brigs, one schooner and one sloop.
Page 96 - French commandant, were there burnt to death, with the most awful tortures. Smith stood upon the battlements, and witnessed the shocking spectacle. The prisoner was tied to a stake, with his hands raised above his head, stripped naked, and surrounded by Indians. They would touch him with...
Page 260 - Resolved that the United States ought to co-operate with any state which may adopt gradual abolishment of slavery, giving to such state pecuniary aid, to be used by such state in its discretion, to compensate for the inconveniences public and private, produced by such change of system.
Page 34 - Soon after this, my companion in captivity, John Stewart, was killed by the savages, and the man that came with my brother returned home by himself.
Page 161 - that they delegate to their said representatives full powers to take such measures for obtaining admission of the district as a separate and independent member of the United States of America, and the navigation of the Mississippi, as may appear most conducive to those purposes; and also to form a constitution of government for the district...
Page 33 - During this time we discovered no uneasiness or desire to escape, which made them less suspicious of us; but in the dead of night, as we lay in a thick cane-brake by a large fire, when sleep had locked up their senses, my situation not disposing me for rest, I touched my companion and gently awoke him.
Page 73 - Two darling sons, and a brother, have I lost by savage hands, which have also taken from me forty valuable horses, and abundance of cattle. Many dark and. sleepless nights have I been a companion for owls, separated from the cheerful society of men, scorched by the summer's sun, and pinched by the winter's cold, an instrument ordained to settle the wilderness.
Page 34 - I returned home to my family with a determination to bring them as soon as possible to live in Kentucky, which I esteemed a second Paradise, at the risk of my life and fortune.
Page 33 - ... night, as we lay in a thick cane-brake by a large fire, when sleep had locked up their senses, my situation not disposing me for rest, I touched my companion and gently awoke him. We improved this favourable opportunity, and departed, leaving them to take their rest, and speedily directed our course towards our old camp, but found it plundered, and the company dispersed and gone home.
Page 34 - On the first of May 1770, my brother returned home by himself, for a new recruit of horses and ammunition, leaving me alone, without bread, salt, or sugar, or even a horse or dog.

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