The Fortunate Pilgrim

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, Sep 28, 2004 - Fiction - 304 pages
5 Reviews
efore The Godfather and The Last Don, there was Puzo's classic story about the loves, crimes and struggles confronted by one family of New York City immigrants living in Hell's Kitchen. Fresh from the farms in Italy, Lucia Santa struggles to hold her family together in a strange land. At turns poignant, comic and violent, and with a new preface by the author, The Fortunate Pilgrim is Italian-American fiction at its very best.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

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FORTUNATE PILGRIM LIB/E 8K

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

A young girl comes to New York from Italy to marry a man she hardly knows, thus beginning the saga of Lucia Santa and her two marriages, her five children, and her struggle to raise her family in Hell ... Read full review

The fortunate pilgrim

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Puzo has called this 1965 pre-Godfather novel his personal favorite of his oeuvre. It recounts the life of Lucia Santa Angeluzzi-Corbo, a Southern Italian immigrant who settles in New York in the ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
22
Section 3
47
Section 4
62
Section 5
73
Section 6
88
Section 7
105
Section 8
123
Section 17
217
Section 18
221
Section 19
231
Section 20
235
Section 21
240
Section 22
246
Section 23
259
Section 24
262

Section 9
133
Section 10
155
Section 11
162
Section 12
172
Section 13
179
Section 14
185
Section 15
197
Section 16
206
Section 25
268
Section 26
270
Section 27
277
Section 28
279
Section 29
281
Section 30
285
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Mario Puzo, best known as the author of The Godfather, was born on October 15, 1920 in the Hell's Kitchen area of New York City. He served in the U. S. Army during World War II, and when he returned attended New York's School for Social Research and Columbia University. He wrote pulp stories and edited Male magazine before publishing his first novel, The Dark Arena (1955). His works were well-received critically, but failed to generate much revenue until he published his most notable work, The Godfather, which was ultimately made into a trilogy of award-winning movies. Puzo continued writing novels, and his final work, Omerta, was finished not long before his death. He also wrote several screenplays. Puzo died on July 2, 1999 in Bay Shore, Long Island.

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