Horace Walpole's marginal notes written in dr. Maty's Miscellaneous works and memoirs of the earl of Chesterfield, 2 vols ... 1777. (more complete) [ed. by R.S. Turner].

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1867
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Page 58 - I HEARD the other day with great pleasure from my worthy friend Mr. Dodsley, that Mr. Johnson's English Dictionary, with a grammar and history of our language prefixed, will be published this winter in two large volumes in folio.
Page 46 - R , with many good qualities, and even learning and parts, had a strong desire of being thought skilful in physic, and was very expert in bleeding. Lord Chesterfield, who knew his foible, and on a particular occasion wished to have his vote, came to him one morning, and, after having conversed upon...
Page 47 - ... of the question which is to be debated; but you, who have considered it, which side will you be of? " The earl, having gained his confidence, easily directed his judgment: he carried him to the House, and got him to vote as he pleased. He used afterwards to say, " That none of his friends had done as much as he, having literally bled for the good of his country.
Page 41 - No, ladies," interrupted the Earl, " I do not love fuch tremendous profpedts. When the faith of your ladyfhips has removed the mountains, I will go to Wales with all my heart.
Page 47 - This is an abfolute miftake. It was not Lord Chefterfield, but Lord Carteret, that made that fpeech which concluded, " a war, my lords, that will be drenched with the blood of kings and warned with the tears of queens.
Page 40 - To tell you the truth, we have both been dead this twelvemonth, but we do not own it.
Page 46 - Chesterfield, who knew his foible, and on a particular occasion wished to have his vote, came to him one morning, and, after having conversed upon indifferent matters, complained of the headache, and desired his lordship to feel his pulse.
Page 50 - On this Walpole notes thus : — " General Charles Churchill, the great Patron of Ward. Queen Caroline, asking the general if it was true that Ward's medicine had made a man mad, a? was reported, he said,
Page 11 - Amongft thefe were Cobham, Bathurft, Queenfbury, Pulteney, Orrery, Lyttelton, Marchmont, Murray — names facred in the annals of their country, and immortalized by the poet they loved. This is one of Dr. Maty's miftakes, who miftook Boyle in Pope's works to mean Lord Orrery inftead of Lord Burlington. Lord Orrery, afterwards Lord Corke, was certainly never intimate with Pope, though he was with Swift ; nor is ever mentioned by the former. PAGES 41-2. (1727...

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