Paxton's Flower Garden, Volume 2

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Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Company, 1883 - Flowers
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Page 56 - As a hedge it would forma very close shelter, and the leaves, evergreen and nearly as prickly as a Holly, would render it almost impervious to most animals. The leaves vary from roundish ovate to elliptic, and are of a thick rigid consistence; the serratures are quite sharp; the young shoots are covered more or less with stellate hairs, and for some time tufts of this kind of down remain on the under side of the midrib of the leaves, which are, however, at length perfectly smooth, and of a dark-green...
Page 66 - Avoeado is very dangerous if pulled and eaten before maturity; being known to produee fever and dysentery. ' If you take the stone of the seed,' says Barham, ' and write upon a white wall, the letters will turn as red as blood, and never go out till the wall is white-washed again, and then with diffieulty."— Вot.
Page 128 - ... on tropical mountains to various altitudes from the level of the sea to the line of perpetual snow. These points have been already so fully developed and explained, that we need not here further insist upon them.
Page 128 - ... described as the most desolate and sterile of any part of the western coast of Patagonia. One variety grows to an enormous size, particularly in the vicinity of the snow-line. Trees have been seen by Mr. Lobb upwards of 100 feet in height, and more than eight feet in diameter. Saxe-Gothœa may be described as a genus with the male flowers of a podocarp, the females of a dammar, the fruit of a juniper, the seed of a dacrydium, and the habit of a yew.
Page 146 - ... a singular phenomenon. Every evening they rose up and lifted themselves from the blossoms to expose them to the dew, so that each morning these beautiful objects were uncovered ; but as day advanced the leaves gradually drooped, and bent down over the flowers to guard them from the rays of the sun.
Page 146 - ... rose up and lifted themselves from the blossoms to expose them to the dew, so that each morning these beautiful objects were uncovered ; but as day advanced the leaves gradually drooped, and bent down over the flowers to guard them from the rays of the sun. Who can imagine the gorgeousness of an equinoctial forest at midnight with the veils thus lifted off myriads of flowers of every form and hue, which are hidden from our gaze in this or other ways during the hours of a tropical sunlit day,...
Page 108 - Genus OXYDENDRUM, DC (Sorrel Tree.) From two Greek words meaning sour and tree. Fig. 21.— Sorrel Tree, Sour Wood. O. arbbreum (L.), DC Leaves, SIMPLE ; ALTERNATE ; EDGE TOOTHED. Outline, oval. Apex, pointed. Base, rounded or slightly pointed. Leaf, four to six inches long, one and a half to two and a half inches wide, soon becoming smooth, with a decided acid taste (whence the name). Bark of trunk, rough and deeply furrowed. Flowers, white, in loose and long one-sided clusters. Found, from Pennsylvania...
Page 56 - St. Barbara is situated, and, being evergreen, forms a conspicuous and predominant feature in the vegetation of this remote and singular part of the western world. It appears more sparingly around Monterey, ami scarcely extends on the north as far as the line of the Oregon territory.
Page 44 - I concluded they had inadvertantly left me, to see some other object, and immediately called to them. They, in answer, remarked the distant sound of my voice, and inquired if I were behind the tree ! — When the road through this forest was forming, a man who had only about...
Page 128 - The whole countrv, from the Andes to the sea, is formed of a succession of ridges of mountains gradually rising from the sea to the central ridge. The whole is thickly wooded from the base to the snow line. Ascending the Andes of...

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