The American Manual, Or, New English Reader: Consisting of Exercises in Reading and Speaking, Both in Prose and Poetry; Selected from the Best Writers. To which are Added, a Succint History of the Colonies, from the Discovery of North America to the Close of the War of the Revolution; the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States, and of the State of New York. For the Use of Schools

Front Cover
R.L. Underhill & Company, 1840 - Readers - 300 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 166 - Opportunity. There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune, Omitted, all the voyage of their life Is bound in shallows, and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat; And we must take the current when it serves. Or lose our ventures.
Page 110 - It is in vain, sir, to extenuate' the matter. Gentlemen may cry peace—peace,—but there is no peace. The war is actually begun ! The next gale that sweeps from the north, will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field ! Why stand we here idle?
Page 290 - 3. The free exercise and enjoyment of religious profession and worship, without discrimination or preference, shall forever be allowed in this state, to all mankind; but the liberty of conscience hereby secured, shall not be so construed as to excuse acts of licentiousness, or justify practices inconsistent with the peace or safety of this state.
Page 203 - 6. Lightly they'll speak of the spirit that's gone, And o'er his cold ashes upbraid him But little he'll reck if they let him sleep on, In the grave where his comrades have laid him. 7. Not the half of our heavy task was done, When the bell toll'd the hour for retiring; And we heard,
Page 109 - stationed in every house ? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs, and hugging the delusive phantom of hope until our enemies shall have bound us, hand and foot ? Sir, we are not weak, if we make a proper use of
Page 154 - from everlasting to everlasting thou art God." " Of old hast thou laid the foundations of the earth, and the heavens are the work of thy hands. They shall perish, but thou shall endure; yea, all of them shall wax old like a garment, as a vesture shall
Page 203 - around him. 4. Few and short were the prayers we said, And we spoke not a word of sorrow ; But we steadfastly gazed on the face of the dead, And bitterly thought of the morrow. That the foe and the stranger would tread o'er his head, And we, far away
Page 289 - I. Members of the legislature, and all officers, executive and judicial, except such inferior officers as may by law be exempted, shall, before they enter on the duties of their respective offices, take and subscribe the following oath or affirmation: I do solemnly swear, (or affirm, as the case may be,) that I will support the constitution of
Page 109 - alone. There is a just God,-who presides over the destinies of nations, and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave. Besides, sir, we have no election.
Page 276 - peaceably to assemble, and to petition the "overnment for a redress of grievances. ARTICLE II. A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed. ARTICLE in. No soldier shall, in time of peace,

Bibliographic information