Observations on Man, His Frame, His Duty, and His Expectations

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T.Tegg and son, 1834 - Apologetics - 604 pages
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Contents

The formation of complex miniature vibrations by association
50
It is probable that muscular motion is performed by the same
56
The generation and association of motory vibratiuncles
64
The manner in which the endeavour to obtain pleasure and remove pain is generated
71
An inquiry how far the phenomena of wounds burns bruises
80
An inquiry how far the tangible qualities of bodies admit of
86
The manner and degree in which we are enabled to judge
89
The manner and degree in which these automatic motions
95
An inquiry how far the phaenomena of thirst are agreeable
102
The Sense of Smell
113
The manner and degree in which these automatic motions
119
The manner and degree in which these automatic motions
120
Distribution of the Second Part 323
124
An inquiry how far the judgments made by sight concerning
126
The automatic motions which are excited by impressions made
135
The immediate organ of hearing and the general uses of
140
The manner and degree in which agreeable and disagreeable
146
The manner and degree in which these automatic motions
150
Other Motions automatic and voluntary not considered in the fore
153
An inquiry how far convulsive motions are agreeable to
160
Sect VIII
166
Consequences of this association of ideas with words
175
The nature of characters intended to represent objects and ideas
182
The general nature of a philosophical language with short hints concerning the methods in which one might be constructed
199
An illustration and confirmation of the general doctrine of asso
201
Rules for the ascertainment of truth and advancement of know
210
A general application of the theory of this and the foregoing
222
The Affections in general The origin and nature of the passions in general
231
Imagination Reveries and Dreams
240
Sect VII
253
CHAP IV
261
Sect II
278
things the previous circumstances remaining the same 357 The infinite power and knowledge of God exclude freewill
363
THE TRUTH OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION
366
Three different suppositions which may be made concerning
372
The great importance of the Scriptures proves their genuineness
382
The agreement of the books of the Old and New Testaments
398
Divine communications miracles and prophecies are agreeable
407
The historical evidences for the genuineness truth and divine
415
The double uses and applications of the types and prophecies
422
The excellence of the doctrines contained in the Scriptures
429
The mutual instrumentality of beings to each others happiness
435
The reception which false religions have met with in the world
441
Sect I
445
This rule corrects and improves itself perpetually
452
Practical rules concerning diet
459
Practical rules concerning the commerce between the sexes
465
Practical rules concerning the hardships pains and uneasinesses
471
Sect IV
483
Sect V
491
Practical observations on selfinterest and selfannihilation
497
The Regard due to the Pleasures and Pains of Sympathy
498
Practical rules for the conduct of men towards each other
504
Sect VII
514
Practical rules concerning the manner of expressing the theo
528
Practical rules for the regulation and improvement of the moral
532
CHAP IV
545
PAGE
549
Sect III
558
The Christian revelation gives us an absolute assurance of
565
It seems probable that the soul may remain in a state
571
It follows from the declarations of the Scriptures that the bulk
573
Sect V
581
Conclusion
593

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Page 596 - Many shall be purified, and made white, and tried; but the wicked shall do wickedly: and none of the wicked shall understand; but the wise shall understand.
Page 543 - Art thou called being a servant '( care not for it : but if thou mayest be made free, use it rather.
Page 587 - O that they were wise, that they understood this, that they would consider their latter end!
Page 542 - Him that is weak in the faith receive ye, but not to doubtful disputations. For one believeth that he may eat all things ; another, who is weak, eateth herbs. Let not him that eateth, despise him that eateth not ; and let not him which eateth not, judge him that eateth; for God hath received him.
Page 594 - Then," in the full sense of the words (Rev. xi. 15), " shall the kingdoms of this world become the kingdoms of our LORD, and of his CHRIST, and he shall reign for ever and ever.
Page 37 - Sensory vibrations, by being often repeated, beget, in the medullary substance of the brain, a> disposition to diminutive vibrations, which may also be called vibratiuncles and miniatures, corresponding to themselves respectively.
Page 52 - If beings of the same nature, but whose affections and passions are, at present, in different proportions to each other, be exposed for an indefinite time to the same impressions and associations, all their particular differences will, at last, be overruled, and they will become perfectly similar, or even equal. They may also be made perfectly similar, in a finite time, by a proper adjustment of the impressions and associations.
Page 8 - External objects impressed upon the senses occasion, first on the nerves on which they are impressed, and then on the brain, vibrations of the small and, as we may say, infinitesimal medullary particles. "These vibrations are motions backwards and forwards of the small particles ; of the same kind with the oscillations of pendulums and the tremblings of the particles of sounding bodies. They must be conceived to be exceedingly short and small, so as not to have the least efficacy to disturb or move...
Page 41 - The influence of association over our ideas, opinions, and affections, is so great and obvious, as scarcely to have escaped the notice of any writer who has treated of these, though the word association, in the particular sense here affixed to it, was first brought into use by Mr. Locke. But all that has been delivered by the ancients and moderns, concerning the power of habit, custom, example, education, authority, party-prejudice, the manner of learning the manual and liberal arts, etc. goes upon...
Page 588 - ... case it seems, that the infinite goodness of God, so many ways declared in the scriptures, must soon turn the scale. For the scriptures must be made consistent with themselves; and the veracity and goodness of God seem much rather to oblige him to perform a promise, than to execute a threatening. 1 will mention a few passages, some of which it may be observed even establish the contrary doctrine of the ultimate happiness of all mankind. Thus the most natural, as well as the most strict and literal...

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