Religion and Faction in Hume's Moral Philosophy

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 23, 1997 - Philosophy - 300 pages
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This book explores Hume's concern with the destructiveness of religious factions and his efforts to develop, in his moral philosophy, a solution to factional conflict. Sympathy and the related capacity to enter into foreign points of view are crucial to the neutralization of religious zeal and the naturalization of ethics. Jennifer Herdt suggests that Hume's preoccupation with religious faction is the key which reveals the unity of his varied philosophical, aesthetic, political, and historical works.
  

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Contents

Setting sympathys stage
17
Interestedness and intelligibility
24
The solution of sympathy
29
Sympathy and the experimental method
35
Displacing Providence
39
The Hutcheson connection
50
Accounting for approbation
60
The problem of contradiction
65
The problem of vicious manners
133
Divergent sympathies
143
Beyond poetry history speculation and religion
157
Religion and irrationality in history
168
Varieties of religious belief
171
Hume vs Pascal
181
Irony and sentimentality in the History of England
188
Zeal and faction
197

Sympathy and the Enquiry
71
Poetical systems and the pleasures of tragedy
82
The Douglas controversy
87
Of tragedy
98
Fiction reality and belief
105
the dangers of detachment
113
Sympathetic understanding and the threat of difference
117
The limits of sympathetic understanding
206
Conclusion
219
Notes
234
Select bibliography
283
Index
293
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