The beauties of Johnson: choice selections from his works

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Leavitt & company, 1851
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Page 30 - He shall be supported, said my uncle Toby; He'll drop at last, said the corporal, and what will become of his boy? He shall not drop, said my uncle Toby, firmly. A-well-o'-day, do what we can for him...
Page 32 - The blood and spirits of Le Fever, which were waxing cold and slow within him, and were retreating to their last citadel, the heart — rallied back, — the film forsook his eyes for a moment, — he looked up wishfully in my uncle Toby's face, — then cast a look upon his boy, — and that ligament, fine as it was, — was never broken. — Nature instantly ebbed again, — the film returned to its place, — the pulse fluttered — stopped — went on — throbbed — stopped again — moved...
Page 148 - What better can we do, than to the place Repairing where he judg'd us, prostrate fall Before him reverent, and there confess Humbly our faults, and pardon beg, with tears Watering the ground, and with our sighs the air Frequenting, sent from hearts contrite, in sign Of sorrow unfeign'd, and humiliation meek?
Page 32 - Toby, not the effect of familiarity, but the cause of it, — which let you at once into his soul and showed you the goodness of his nature ; to this, there was something in his looks, and voice, and manner, superadded, which eternally beckoned to the unfortunate to come and take shelter under him ; so that before my uncle Toby had half finished the kind offers he was making to the father, had the son insensibly pressed up close to his knees, and had taken hold of the breast of his coat, and was...
Page 30 - My uncle Toby went to his bureau, put his purse into his breeches pocket, and having ordered the Corporal to go early in the morning for a physician, he went to bed and fell asleep.
Page 21 - Antiquity, like every other quality that attracts the notice of mankind has undoubtedly votaries that reverence it, not from reason, but from prejudice. Some seem to admire indiscriminately whatever has been long preserved without considering that time has sometimes co-operated with chance ; all perhaps are more willing to honour past than present excellence; and the mind contemplates genius through the shades of age as the eye surveys the sun through artificial opacity.
Page 28 - Thou hast left this matter short, " said my Uncle Toby to the Corporal as he was putting him to bed, "and I will tell thee in what, Trim. In the first place, when thou madest an...
Page 22 - I get better, my dear, said he, as he gave his purse to his son to pay the man, — we can hire horses from hence. But alas! the poor gentleman will never get from hence, said the landlady to me, — for I heard the death-watch all night long ; and when he dies, the youth, his son, will certainly die with him ; for he is broken-hearted already. I was hearing this account...
Page 13 - Piety is the only proper and adequate relief of decaying man. He that grows old without religious hopes, as he declines into imbecility, and feels pains and...
Page 28 - I wish," said my Uncle Toby, with a deep sigh, " I wish, Trim, I was asleep." "Your honour," replied the corporal, "is too much concerned; shall I pour your honour out a glass of sack to your pipe ? " " Do, Trim,

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