Democracy, Education, and Equality: Graz-Schumpeter Lectures

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jan 9, 2006 - Business & Economics - 177 pages
0 Reviews
This study asks whether democracy, modeled as competition between political parties that represent different interests in the polity, will result in educational funding policies that will, at least eventually, produce citizens who have equal capacities (human capital), thus breaking the link between family background and child prospects. In other words, will democracy engender, through the educational finance policies it produces, a state of equal opportunity in the long run? Several models of the problem are studied, which vary according to the educational technology posited, i.e. the relationship between family inputs, school inputs, and the eventual human capital of the adult the child becomes.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

A Brief Overview
1
Models of Party Competition
11
Democratic Competition over Educational Investment
35
The Dynamics of Human Capital with Exogenous Growth
65
The Dynamics of Human Capital with Endogenous Growth
97
Estimation of Technological Parameters
109
Conclusion
129
References
139
Proofs of Theorems
143
Index
169
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

John E. Roemer is Elizabeth S. and A. Varick Stout Professor of Political Science at Yale University. He has published extensively in economics, political philosophy, and political science. His recent books include Political Competition (2001), Equality of Opportunity (1998), Theories of Distributive Justice (1996), and A Future for Socialism (Cambridge University Press, 1994). He was named a Felow of the Econometric Society in 1986.

John E. Roemer is Elizabeth S. and A. Varick Stout Professor of Political Science at Yale University. He has published extensively in economics, political philosophy, and political science. His recent books include Political Competition (2001), Equality of Opportunity (1998), Theories of Distributive Justice (1996), and A Future for Socialism (Cambridge University Press, 1994). He was named a Felow of the Econometric Society in 1986.