A Room with a View

Front Cover
E. Arnold, 1922 - British - 318 pages
97 Reviews
"When a young Englishwoman named Lucy Honeychurch and her spinster chaperone Charlotte travel to Italy, they become acquainted with a free-spirited and unconventional Englishman named Mr. Emerson, and his enigmatic and romantically unhappy son, George. After George kisses Lucy during a picnic in the Florentine hills, Charlotte rushes her back to England. Safely home, Lucy becomes engaged to her stiff and very proper fiancÚ Cecil. After finding out the Emersons have moved close by Lucy has a hard time ignoring her attraction to the unsuitable George and must wrestle with her inner romantic longings and choose between passion and convention"--Container.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - booklovers2 - LibraryThing

Our Book Club Classic Read - Listened to this on audio. An absolute delightful coming of the age love story. A touching story with a splash of comedy. Lucy Honeychurch finds herself in a precarious ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ctpress - LibraryThing

A young man steals a kiss from Lucy Honeychurch on a vacation in Italy - and Lucy begins to question her narrow life, her selfish fiancÚ, her conventional family, her bleak future. What I appreciate ... Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

I
11
II
28
III
50
IV
65
V
75
VI
93
VII
109
VIII
127
XI
181
XII
189
XIII
203
XIV
215
XV
224
XVI
244
XVII
256
XVIII
265

IX
148
X
168

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Page 156 - own. She flushed again and said: "What height; " 'Come down, O maid, from yonder mountain height, What pleasure lives in height (the shepherd sang),
Page 208 - me. No doubt I am neither artistic nor literary nor intellectual nor musical, but I cannot help the drawing-room furniture; your father bought it and we must put up with it, will Cecil kindly remember." "I—I see what you mean, and certainly Cecil oughtn't to. But he does not mean to be uncivil —he once
Page 267 - darkness. She put out the lamp. It did not do to think, nor, for the matter of that to feel. She gave up. trying to understand herself, and joined the vast armies of the benighted, who follow neither the heart nor the brain, and
Page 111 - a neutral, was bidden to collect the factions for the return home. There was a general sense of groping and bewilderment. Pan had been amongst them—not the great god Pan, who has been buried these two thousand years, but the little god Pan, who presides over social contretemps and
Page 43 - Remember," he was saying, "the facts about this church of Santa Croce; how it was built by faith in the full fervour of medievalism, before any taint of the Renaissance had appeared. Observe how Giotto in these frescoes—now, unhappily, ruined by restoration—is untroubled by the snares of anatomy and perspective. Could anything be
Page 313 - spoke at once—his salutation remained. He had robbed the body of its taint, the world's taunts of their sting; he had shown her the holiness of direct desire. She "never exactly understood," she would say in after years, "how he managed to strengthen her. It was as if he had made her see the whole of everything at once.
Page 320 - is just possible." Youth enwrapped them; the song of Phaethon announced passion requited, love attained.^ But they were conscious of a love more mysterious than this. The song died away; they heard the river, bearing' down the snows of winter into the Mediterranean.
Page 242 - —and that the power they have over us is sometimes supernatural, for the same reason." Lucy's lips parted. "For a crowd is more than the people who make it up. Something gets added to it—no one knows how—just as something has got added to those hills." He pointed with his racquet to the South Downs. "What a splendid
Page 32 - is only to be found by patient observation." This sounded very interesting, and Lucy hurried over her breakfast, and started with her new friend in high spirits. Italy was coming at last. The Cockney Signora and her works had vanished like a bad dream. Miss Lavish—for that was the clever lady's
Page 241 - view of the sky straight over our heads, and that all these views on earth are but bungled copies of it." "I expect your father has been reading Dante," said Cecil, fingering the novel, which alone permitted him to lead the conversation. "He told us another day that views are really