Journal of the New England Water Works Association, Volume 3

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New England Water Works Association., 1889 - Water-supply
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Page 48 - ... after it is discharged from such reservoir, and before it is passed into the mains or pipes of the company for distribution, or to any reservoir the whole of the water from which is distributed through distinct mains or pipes for other than domestic purposes, nor to any reservoir whatever the water stored in which shall be used exclusively for other than domestic purposes.
Page 161 - ... but the emergence of the fold above the general surface of the country was little or no faster than the progress of the corrasion of the channel. We may say, then, that the river did not cut its way down through the mountains, from a height of many thousand feet above its present site, but, having an elevation differing but little, perhaps, from what it now...
Page 161 - But the carving of the canons and mountains is insignificant, when compared with the denudation of the whole area, as evidenced in the cliffs of erosion. Beds hundreds of feet in thickness and hundreds of thousands of square miles in extent, beds of granite and beds of schist, beds of marble and beds of sandstone, crumbling shales and adamantine lavas have slowly yielded to the silent and unseen powers of the air, and crumbled into dust and been washed away by the rains and carried into the sea by...
Page 160 - The answer is that the river had the right of way; in other words, it was running ere the mountains were formed: not before the rocks of which the mountains are composed, were deposited, but before the formations were folded, so as to make a mountain range.
Page 149 - That these resolutions be spread upon the records of the Association, and that a copy thereof be sent to the family of the deceased.
Page 48 - Metropolis, or any part thereof is stored or kept by any Company shall be roofed in, or otherwise covered over, provided always that this provision shall not extend to any reservoir, the water from which is subjected by the Company to efficient filtration after it is discharged from such reservoir, and before it is passed into the mains or pipes of the Company for distribution, or to any reservoir, the whole of the water from which is distributed through distinct mains or pipes for other than domestic...
Page 160 - ... apparently, it might have passed around them to the east, through valleys, for there are such along the north side of the Uintas, extending to the east, where the mountains are degraded to hills, and, passing around these, there are other valleys, extending to the Green, on the south side of the range. Then, why did the river run through the mountains ? The first explanation suggested is that it followed a previously formed fissure through the range; but very little examination will show that...
Page 38 - Now, as such waters always contain much air dissolved in them, the decomposing agent is ready at hand to exert its influence the moment the matter is received into the water ; in addition to which the motion causes a further action by the exposure to the atmosphere, and when (as in the Thames) the water falls frequently over weirs, passes through locks, etc., causing further agitation and aeration, the process must go on more speedily and more effectually.
Page 161 - ... of the channel. We may say, then, that the river did not cut its way down through the mountains, from a height of many thousand feet above its present site ; but, having an elevation differing but little, perhaps, from what it now has, as the fold was lifted, it cleared away the obstruction by cutting a canon and the walls were thus elevated on either side. The river preserved its level, but mountains were lifted up ; as the saw revolves on a fixed pivot, while the log through which it cuts is...
Page 160 - To a person studying the physical geography of this country, without a knowledge of its geology, it would seem very strange that the river should cut through the mountains, when apparently it might have passed around them to the east, through valleys, for there are such along the north side of the Uintas, extending to the east, where the mountains are degraded to hills ; and, passing around these, there are other valleys, extending to the Green, on the south side of the range. Then, why did the river...

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