The Fruits and Fruit-trees of America; Or, The Culture, Propagation, and Management, in the Garden and Orchard, of Fruit-trees Generally: With Descriptions of All the Finest Varieties of Fruit, Native and Foreign, Cultivated in this Country

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J. Wiley, 1900 - Fruit - 1287 pages
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Page 58 - Here's to thee, old apple-tree, Whence thou mayst bud, and whence thou mayst blow ! And whence thou mayst bear apples enow ! Hats full! caps full! Bushel — bushel — sacks full, And my pockets full too ! Huzza...
Page 41 - ... leaving the topmost for a leader. The side shoots will, in most cases, assume a regular shape ; if not, they may be this first season tied to slight stakes to make them grow in the proper direction. This is best done by bringing down and fastening the end of each shoot to a slight stake, so that an open pyramid may be formed — for if it is too close and cypresslike, enough air is not admitted to the fruit. They may remain unpruned till the end of August, when each shoot must be shortened to...
Page 4 - that when a graft is taken from one of these trees and " placed upon another stock, this grafted tree is found to lose " its singular property of producing the same variety by 'seed, and becomes like all other worked trees;" — that is, its seedlings become highly variable.
Page 979 - Ripe blushing strawberries eaten from the plant, or served with sugar and cream are certainly Arcadian dainties with a true paradisical flavor," and fortunately they are so easily grown that the poorest owner of a few feet of ground may have them in abundance.
Page 28 - ... and fruit is increased by this apparent obstruction of the descending sap ; and the fruit of such young trees ripens, I think, somewhat earlier than upon other young trees of the same age, which grow upon stocks of their own species; but the growth and vigour of the tree, and its power to nourish a succession of heavy crops, are diminished, apparently, by the stagnation, in the branches and stock, of a portion of that sap which, in a tree growing upon its own stem, or upon a stock of its own...
Page 43 - From this time it may be allowed to bear what crop of fruit the gardener thinks it able to carry ; in determining which he ought never to overrate the vigour of the tree. All of these shoots, except the leading ones, must at the proper season be shortened, but to what length, must be left entirely to the judgment of the gardener ; it, of course, depending upon the vigour of the tree. In shortening the shoot...
Page 980 - Fig. 84."Early in April, or in August, being provided with a good stock of strong, young plants, select a suitable piece of good, deep soil. Dig in a heavy coat of stable manure, pulverizing well and raking the top soil. Strike out the rows three feet apart with a line. The plants should now be planted along each line about a foot apart in the row. They will soon send out runners, and these runners should be allowed to take possession of every alternate strip of three feet, the other...
Page 54 - Hudson may, from the ameliorating influence of the river, be said to be a mouth longer — a fortnight earlier in spring and later in autumn — than in the same latitude a few miles distant ; and crops of the more tender fruits are therefore much more certain on the banks of large rivers or lakes than in inland districts of the same climate.
Page 1 - Transplanted into a wanner aspect, stimulated by a richer soil, reared from selected seeds, carefully pruned, sheltered, and watched, by slow degrees the sour and bitter crab expands into a Golden Pippin, the wild pear loses its thorns and becomes a...
Page 979 - ... the common and ancient practice of laying straw between the plants to keep the fruit clean. In the olden times the varieties of strawberries were very limited, and the garden was chiefly supplied with materials for new plantations from the woods. The strawberry belongs properly to cold climates, and though well known, is of comparatively little value in the south of Europe. Old Roman and Greek poets have not, therefore, sung its praises; but after that line of a Northern bard, "A dish of ripe...

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