Calculus, Volume 1

Front Cover
SIAM, Jan 1, 1991 - Mathematics - 614 pages
8 Reviews
Gilbert Strang's Calculus textbook is ideal both as a course companion and for self study. The author has a direct style. His book presents detailed and intensive explanations. Many diagrams and key examples are used to aid understanding, as well as the application of calculus to physics and engineering and economics. The text is well organized, and it covers single variable and multivariable calculus in depth. An instructor's manual and student guide are available online at http: //ocw.mit.edu/ans7870/resources/Strang/strangtext.htm.
 

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Mathematical inbreeding is an inherent issue if one author is referenced or studied exclusively. While I was originally taught Calculus with George Thomas' excellent text on Calculus, I found that upon review Gilbert Strang packed a little more meat on the bones so to speak, in his introductory text and consequently gained much insight unattainable otherwise. I found the problems and exercises relevant and non trivial enough to keep me from whizzing through the book too fast. I also chuckled at the author's dry sense of humor. This text is a must for any Math maven.
M. Conrad Kabay
 

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The book is really good. It lets u link with physics while studying mathematics.

Contents

Introduction to Calculus
1
Derivatives
44
Applications of the Derivative
91
The Chain Rule
154
Integrals
177
Exponentials and Logarithms
228
Techniques of Integration
282
Applications of the Integral
311
Infinite Series
366
Vectors and Matrices
397
Motion along a Curve
446
Partial Derivatives
471
Multiple Integrals
521
Vector Calculus
549
Mathematics after Calculus
597
Copyright

Polar Coordinates and Complex Numbers
348

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About the author (1991)

Gilbert Strang received his Ph.D. from UCLA and since then he has taught at MIT. He has been a Sloan Fellow and a Fairchild Scholar and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a Professor of Mathematics at MIT and an Honorary Fellow of Balliol College. Professor Strang has published eight textbooks. He received the von Neumann Medal of the US Association for Computational Mechanics, and the Henrici Prize for applied analysis. The first Su Buchin Prize from the International Congress of Industrial and Applied Mathematics, and the Haimo Prize from the Mathematical Association of America, were awarded for his contributions to teaching around the world.

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