A sketch of the history of Poland

Front Cover
London, 1842 - 32 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - ... passed in unforeboding happiness. There I vowed, in the hidden shrine of my oppressed heart (and thousands vowed like me), never to renounce that holy affection which, with unseen fetters, binds every human being to the ground of his native soil, however his exiled foot may wander in distant countries...
Page 8 - ... cruelty ; but we, who preferred renouncing that home, which is no longer our country, — we, who are wandering through foreign lands, sitting down by the waters of Babylon, and mixing our tears with the waves that beat against foreign coasts, — we at least have preserved the right of raising the cry of woe against our tyrant ; of...
Page 8 - But the exiled sons of Poland, the remnants of that which was once the pride of Europe, ought not to confine their feelings at the destruction of their beloved country to useless tears. Those who remained at home, upon the gory soil of their enslaved country, are fettered down into mute oppression, and even the stifled groan that escapes from the lips of those victims is considered as a crime, and punished by...
Page 21 - ... their own people, and thereby divert their attention from France. The agents from Paris, furnished with authentic letters from the most influential personages, promised the chiefs of the then preparing Polish insurrection the most energetic support on the part of France, and thereby contributed much towards hastening the outbreak of the Polish revolution ; while in disappointing the confidence which the Poles had placed upon their solemn promises, they in great measure loaded themselves with...
Page 24 - At the outbreak of the insurrection the Emperor Nicholas had issued a proclamation containing merely the words — " To the Poles : Submission or death." He has literally fulfilled the threat contained in these words ; a nation has been murdered to expiate the political crimes of the world, and France was the Judas Iscariot, who with a kiss betrayed the martyred country of Poland into the hands of the Russian Herod...
Page 12 - The state of internal dissension, which has been alluded to above, had made the Polish crown a prey to the ambition of the surrounding powers, till at last it fell into the unworthy hands of Stanislas Poniatowski, who, although by birth a Polish nobleman, had degraded himself by becoming a tool of the Russian court, hostile to his own country, and by the intrigues of that court he ascended the throne of Poland.
Page 21 - July 1830 the government of their newly created king, Louis Philippe, sent emissaries and agents to Poland, in order to excite the inhabitants of that country to revolt against Russia. The French king, conscious of the hatred prevailing against him in the breasts of the legitimate monarchs, wished to excite their subjects to revolt, in order to engage their strength in the struggle against their own people, and thereby divert their attention from France.
Page 11 - But even from the darkness of that period of internal discord and popular agitation there shine forth some gleams of brightness, which stand in history like monuments of glory ; and the services she rendered to Europe, even during the time of internal struggle, are sufficiently great to deserve eternal acknowledgment, and to make the indifference of Europe at the downfall of Poland appear as the blackest ingratitude.
Page 17 - They agreed upon the necessity of re-establishing the nationality of Poland ; but the powers assembled in Vienna were induced, by the peculiar circumstances of the period, into a practical error, the consequences of which, to the present day, are pressing heavily on the necks of their subjects. Alexander...
Page 22 - Happy thrice happy, are those thousand of Polish warriors who, at the battles of Grochow and Ostrolenka, fell in the sacred warfare for their country's freedom, and whose dying ears were gratified with the glorious cry of Victory ! Happy are those who lie...

Bibliographic information