The Gingerbread Girl

Front Cover
Dutton Children's Books, 2006 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
68 Reviews
The lonely old woman and the lonely old man decide to bake a girl this time, but when they open the oven, she runs off like her brother did. Never fear, this smart cookie has a plan to outfox the fox. Will it work? Let?s just say that the ending is sweet for everyone.

?Ernst?s familiar art, here placed against gingham-check backgrounds, utilizes the oversize format to best advantage, with large characters leaping out of their frames. On the cover, the candy-studded Gingerbread Girl with licorice-whip hair stares boldly out at readers. Kids won?t be able to resist following her inside.??Booklist

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
23
4 stars
22
3 stars
17
2 stars
6
1 star
0

Review: The Gingerbread Girl

User Review  - Goodreads

cute add to original story and awesome ending. Read full review

Review: The Gingerbread Girl

User Review  - Janet Emmett - Goodreads

A cute alternative version of the Gingerbread Man great to use as a comparison. The Gingerbread Girl seems to be just like her brother until the end of the story when she is able to outfox the fox! Read full review

All 5 reviews »

About the author (2006)

David Dyergrew up in a coastal town in NSW, Australia, and graduated as dux of his high school in 1984. After commencing a degree in medicine and surgery at the University of Sydney, he soon decided it was not for him.

David went on to train as a ship's officer at the Australian Maritime College, travelling Australia and the world in a wide range of merchant ships. He graduated from the college with distinction and was awarded a number of prizes, including the Company of Master Mariners Award for highest overall achievement in the course. He then returned to the University of Sydney to complete a combined degree in Arts and Law. David was awarded the Frank Albert Prize for first place in Music I, High Distinctions in all English courses and First Class Honours in Law. From the mid-1990s until early 2000s David worked as a litigation lawyer in Sydney, and then in London at a legal practice whose parent firm represented the Titanic's owners back in 1912. In 2002 David returned to Australia and obtained a Diploma in Education from the University of New England, and commenced teaching English at Kambala, a school for girls in Sydney's eastern suburbs.

David has had a life-long obsession with the Titanic and has become an expert on the subject. In 2009 he was awarded a Commonwealth Government scholarship to write The Midni

Bibliographic information