The Beginnings of San Francisco: From the Expedition of Anza, 1774, to the City Charter of April 15, 1850 : with Biographical and Other Notes, Volume 1

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Zoeth S. Eldredge, 1912 - San Francisco (Calif.) - 837 pages
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Page 390 - Whilst the president will make no effort and use no influence to induce California to become one of the free and independent states of this union, yet if the people should desire to unite their destiny with ours, they would be received as brethren, whenever this can be done without affording Mexico just cause of complaint.
Page 273 - The kings of Tarshish and of the isles shall bring presents: the kings of Sheba and Seba shall offer gifts. Yea, all kings shall fall down before him: all nations shall serve him.
Page 413 - ... on as soon as dry; the saddles were of various fashions, though these and a large drove of horses, and a brass field-gun, were things they had picked up about California. The rest of the gang were a rough set; and perhaps their private, public, and moral characters had better not be too closely examined.
Page 392 - If you ascertain with certainty that Mexico has declared war against the United States, you will at once possess yourself of the port of San Francisco, and blockade or occupy such other ports as your force may permit.
Page 92 - Indian villages in the region, one of them, Yangna, being situated near the heart of what is now Los, Angeles. The first land expedition, under Portola, camped near what is now Elysian Park in 1769. On August 2nd, the day of the Feast of Porciuncula, Father Crespi named the river Rio de Neustra Senora la Reina de los Angeles de Porciuncula (Our Lady, the Queen of the Angels).
Page 380 - You will readily understand that my duties will not permit me to appear before the magistrates of your towns on the complaint of every straggling vagabond who may chance to visit my camp.
Page 397 - We need no horses; saddle no horse for me; I can go to the Spaniards and make freemen of them. I will lay my bones here before I will take upon myself the ignominy of commencing an honorable work and then flee like cowards, like thieves, when no enemy is ia sight.
Page 390 - President will make no effort and use no influence to induce California to become one of the free and independent States of this Union, yet if the People should desire to unite their destiny with ours, they would be received as brethren, whenever this can be done, without affording Mexico just cause of complaint. Their true policy, for the present, in regard to this question, is to let events take their course, unless an attempt should be made to transfer them, without their consent, either to Great...
Page 383 - The last part is a call to arms with a view to 'lance the ulcer,' etc. Its genuineness may be doubted. your care may prove insufficient. . .Your encamping so near town has caused much excitement. The natives are firm in the belief that they will break you up, and that you can be entirely destroyed by their power. In. all probability they will attack you; the result either way may cause trouble hereafter to resident Americans...
Page 199 - Upon his head he wore a black silk handkerchief, the four corners of which hung down his neck behind. An embroidered shirt, a cravat of white jaconet tastefully tied, a blue damask vest, short clothes of crimson velvet, a bright green cloth jacket, with large silver buttons, and shoes of embroidered deer skin, comprised his dress. I was afterwards informed by Don Manuel, that on some occasions, such as some particular feast day or festival, his entire display often exceeded in value a thousand dollars.

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