Strega Nona: An Old Tale

Front Cover
Prentice-Hall, 1975 - Calabria (Italy) - 32 pages
76 Reviews
Strega Nona -- "Grandma Witch" -- is the source for potions, cures, magic, and comfort in her Calabrian town. Her magical everfull pasta pot is especially intriguing to hungry Big Anthony. He is supposed to look after her house and tend her garden but one day, when she goes over the mountain to visit Strega Amelia, Big Anthony recites the magic verse over the pasta pot, with disastrous results.
In this retelling of an old tale, author-illustrator Tomie dePaola (whose middle names "is" Anthony) combines humor in the writing and warmth in the paintings as he builds the story to its hilarious climax.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4 stars
3 stars
2 stars
1 star

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MeaghanRyan - LibraryThing

Strega Nona ("Grandmother Witch") helps all the townspeople with her magic powers. She becomes so busy that she hires Big Anthony to help out. She tells him to stay away from her magic pasta pot...but ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - manamakeri - LibraryThing

A classic folktale about listening to those who are in control and know more. While I understand that viewpoint, I also believe in proper education and engendering trust. Obviously, the entirety of ... Read full review


Section 1
Section 2
Section 3

2 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

About the author (1975)

Tomie dePaola was born in Meriden, Connecticut on September 15, 1934. He received a B.F.A. from Pratt Institute in 1956, a M.F.A. from California College of Arts and Crafts in 1969, and a doctoral equivalency from Lone Mountain College in 1970. He has written and/or illustrated more than 200 books including 26 Fairmount Avenue, Strega Nona, and Meet the Barkers. He has received numerous awards for his work including the Caldecott Honor Award, the Newbery Honor Award and the New Hampshire Governor's Arts Award of Living Treasure. His murals and paintings can be seen in many churches and monasteries throughout New England. He has designed greeting cards, magazine and record album covers, and theater sets. His work is shown in galleries and museums.

Bibliographic information