Landmarks of history. Modern history: from the Reformation to the fall of Napoleon. By the author of the 'Heir of Redclyffe'.

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1857
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Page 433 - ... political right, but honesty and common sense are against us, I must needs confess that never in the whole course of my life have I felt so grieved and ashamed. I know that I stand alone, and am no longer en vigueur ; I must therefore let things take their course — but it is pain and grief to me. Placet — because so many great and learned men will have it so ; but the day is at hand when you will regret this daring violation of all that has hitherto been held sacred.
Page 282 - Huguenot, all the clergy would imitate him. The Gallican Church had always been more obedient to the king than the Pope, chiefly because in early times there had been few collisions between them ; and there was no remonstrance when Louis XIV. extended his regale, or right of appropriating the revenues of vacant benefices, and in other ways domineered over the clergy. The Pope, Innocent XI., rebuked him ; whereupon he convoked a synod of national clergy, and four propositions drawn up by Bossuet were...
Page 93 - ... of the saint whose day it was. He might have improved his success by advancing on Paris ; but he would not venture, and while Coligni was holding out St. Quentin to the last extremity, Henri II. wrote to recall the Duke de Guise and his army, adding, " I hope the Pope will do as much for me in my need as I did for him.
Page 235 - ... the political affairs of the faction. Mary. Don't you think she must have been the sort of woman one calls a termagant? Mrs. M. Indeed I think so; and there was another very conspicuous lady at that time who also belonged to the class of termagants. This was Mademoiselle de Montpensier. She was daughter of Gaston duke of Orleans, by his first wife the heiress of the duke de Montpensier, and inherited from her mother an immense fortune, and from her grandmother (the lady who made herself so conspicuous...
Page 296 - On 4th June. 1602. Henri IV. caused his companion in arms Marshal Biron to be arrested here on a charge of high treason, to be beheaded in the Bastille a month later. Here, in 1685, Louis XIV. signed the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, by which Henri IV. had granted toleration to the Protestants in 15'.8.
Page 432 - Pasha, and so well maintained the honour of his flag, that the Russians were finally obliged to sail back to the Baltic, while the Turks wreaked vengeance in horrible massacres of the unfortunate Greeks of the Morea and the Isles. At the same time, General Romanzoff attacked the Grand Vizier on the banks of the Danube, gained a great victory at Kagul, and received the submission of the three great provinces of Wallachia, Moldavia, and Bessarabia. These being the close neighbours of Austria, that...
Page 431 - Vice-Admiral Elphinstone, four fireships were sent by night among the vessels, crowded into a narrow bay, and burnt the whole Turkish navy, so that the Russian fleet commanded the whole of the Turkish seas, and laid siege to the Isle of Lemnos. Gazi Hassan, an adventurer born on the borders of Persia, who had been a boatman, a chief at Algiers, and a prisoner at Constantinople, but throughout all a devout Mussulman, proposed to the Grand Vizier to attack the Russian fleet with four thousand of the...
Page 433 - On the edge of the copy of the treaty, the Empress Queen wrote, " Placet, because so many great and learned men will have it so ; but after I am dead and gone, people will see the consequences of thus breaking through all that has hitherto been held holy and just. M. Th." In vain she protested. The miserable kingdom, divided against itself, was in a state both to deserve and invite the spoiler. Stanislaus and his Diet had been quarrelling ever since his election, chiefly on account of the disputes...
Page 109 - John," and proposed to pursue the victory, and to found a Christian realm at Tunis, with him for its King. Philip was, however, jealous of his brother, and when the fleet again assembled, sent only twenty-two ships instead of the one hundred he had promised. Nothing decisive could be attempted, and peace was concluded in 1573, leaving Cyprus in possession of the Turks.
Page 375 - ... Cardinal Richelieu, one of the finest pieces of sculpture in Paris : he contemplated the statue of that celebrated minister, to whom France owed so much of her glory and prosperity, with fixed attention for some time, and at last is said to have exclaimed, " Thou great man ! I would have given thee one half of my dominions, to learn of thee how to govern the other.

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