Too Late The Phalarope

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Simon and Schuster, Jan 3, 1996 - Fiction - 287 pages
1 Review
From the author of Cry, The Beloved Country comes a powerful novel of terror and remorse “written in exquisitely balanced prose” (Chicago Sun-Times) about a white policeman who has an affair with a native girl in South Africa.

After violating his country’s ironclad law governing relationships between the races, a young white South African police lieutenant must struggle alone against the censure of an inflexible society, his family, and himself.
 

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The point of not using quotation marks made the novel really hard to follow, and I never really finished it to be honest. Maybe I'll re-read it one day; the story (when read correctly) is supposed to be fantastic.

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Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
14
Section 3
20
Section 4
29
Section 5
37
Section 6
64
Section 7
71
Section 8
76
Section 18
198
Section 19
204
Section 20
213
Section 21
222
Section 22
226
Section 23
233
Section 24
248
Section 25
252

Section 9
100
Section 10
109
Section 11
117
Section 12
140
Section 13
149
Section 14
165
Section 15
168
Section 16
178
Section 17
191
Section 26
259
Section 27
270
Section 28
274
Section 29
279
Section 30
282
Section 31
285
Section 32
289
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About the author (1996)

Alan Paton, a native son of South Africa, was born in Pietermaritzburg, in the province of Natal, in 1903. Paton's initial career was spent teaching in schools for the sons of rich, white South Africans, But at thirty, he suffered a severe attack of enteric fever, and in the time he had to reflect upon his life, he decided that he did not want to spend his life teaching the sons of the rich. He got a job as principal of Diepkloof Reformatory, a huge prison school for delinquent black boys, on the edge of Johannesburg. He worked at Diepkloof for ten years, and at the end of it Paton felt so strongly that he needed a change, that he sold his life insurance policies to finance a prison-study trip that took him to Scandinavia, England, and the United States. It was during this time that he unexpectedly wrote his first published novel, Cry, the Beloved Country. It stands as the single most important novel in South African literature. Alan Paton died in 1988 in South Africa.

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