Speech of Truman Smith, of Connecticut, on the Nebraska question: Delivered in the Senate of the United States, February 10 and 11, 1854

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Printed by J.T. and L. Towers, 1854 - Kansas-Nebraska bill - 23 pages
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Page 12 - Measures, is hereby declared inoperative and void : it being the true intent and meaning of this act, not to legislate slavery into any territory or state, nor to exclude it therefrom, but to leave the people thereof perfectly free to form and regulate their domestic institutions in their own way, subject only to the constitution of the United States...
Page 12 - March 6, 1820, which, being inconsistent with the principle of non-intervention by Congress with slavery in the States and Territories, as recognized by the legislation of 1850, commonly called the compromise measures, is hereby declared inoperative and void— it being the true Intent and meaning of this act, not to legislate slavery into any Territory or State, nor to exclude It therefrom, but to leave the people thereof perfectly free to form and...
Page 11 - First: That all questions pertaining to slavery in the Territories and in the new states to be formed therefrom, are to be left to the decision of the people residing therein, through their appropriate representatives. "Second: That 'all cases involving title to slaves...
Page 16 - I intend to stand or fall; and that is, that the whole territory within the former United States, or in the newly acquired Mexican provinces, has a fixed and settled character, now fixed and settled by law which cannot be repealed; in the case of Texas without a violation of public faith, and...
Page 15 - I now say, Sir, as the proposition upon which I stand this day, and upon the truth and firmness of which I intend to act until it is overthrown, that there is not at this moment within the United States, or any territory of the United States, a single foot of land, the character of which, in regard to its being free territory or slave territory, is not fixed by some law, and some irrepealable law, beyond the power of the action of the government.
Page 22 - That mankind are all formed by the same Almighty Being, alike objects of his care, and equally designed for the enjoyment of happiness, the Christian religion teaches us to believe, and the political creed of Americans fully coincides with the position.
Page 8 - An act to provide for an exchange of lands, with the Indians residing in any of the States or Territories, and for their removal west of the Mississippi...
Page 22 - States ;' and as they conceive that these blessings ought rightfully to be administered without distinction of color to all descriptions of people, so they indulge themselves in the pleasing expectation that nothing which can be done for the relief of the unhappy objects of their care will be either omitted or delayed.
Page 13 - Kansas ; and when admitted as a state or states, the said territory, or any portion of the same, shall be received into the Union with or without slavery, as their constitution may prescribe at the time of their admission...
Page 6 - That no person shall be permitted to trade with any of the Indians (in the Indian country) without a license therefor from a superintendent of Indian affairs, or Indian agent or sub-agent, which license shall be issued for a term not exceeding two years for the tribes east of the Mississippi, and not exceeding three years for the tribes west of that river.

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