Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, Part 1

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Vols. for 1847-1963/64 include the Institution's Report of the Secretary, also published separately.
 

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Page 101 - Our day of dependence, our long apprenticeship to the learning of other lands, draws to a close. The millions that around us are rushing into life cannot always be fed on the sere remains of foreign harvests.
Page x - Washington, during the time for which they shall hold their respective offices ; three members of the Senate, and three members of the House of Representatives, together with six other persons, other than members of Congress, two of whom shall be...
Page 97 - Promote, then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.
Page xlvii - ... subject to such regulations for the security of the revenue and for the collection of import duties as the Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe: Provided, That all such articles, when sold or withdrawn for consumption...
Page x - Institution, to be composed of the VicePresident, the Chief- Justice of the United States [and the Governor of the District of Columbia], three members of the Senate, and three members of the House of Representatives, together with six other persons, other than members of Congress, two of whom shall be resident in the city of Washington...
Page 45 - For expenses of the system of international exchanges between the United States and foreign countries, under the direction of the Smithsonian Institution, including salaries or compensation of all necessary employees, and the purchase of necessary books and periodicals, $32,000.
Page 22 - In these almost solid masses, they darted forward in undulating and angular lines, descended and swept close over the earth with inconceivable velocity, mounted perpendicularly so as to resemble a vast column, and, when high, were seen wheeling and twisting within their continued lines, which then resembled the coils of a gigantic serpent Before sunset I reached Louisville, distant from Hardensburgh fiftyfive miles.
Page 463 - ... animals are painted by nature darkest on those parts which tend to be most lighted by the sky's light,
Page 331 - It seems, therefore, on the whole most probable that the sun has not illuminated the earth for 100,000,000 years, and almost certain that he has not done so for 500,000,000 years. As for the future, we may say, with equal certainty, that inhabitants of the earth cannot continue to enjoy the light and heat essential to their life for many million years longer unless sources now unknown to us are prepared in the great storehouse of creation.
Page 22 - In the autumn of 1813, I left my house at Henderson, on the banks of the Ohio, on my way to Louisville. In passing over the Barrens a few miles beyond...

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