The Letters to Philemon, the Colossians, and the Ephesians: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on the Captivity Epistles

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, Nov 26, 2007 - Religion - 382 pages
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This volume completes Ben Witherington's contributions to the set of Eerdmans socio-rhetorical commentaries on the New Testament.

In addition to the usual features of these commentaries, Witherington offers an innovative way of looking at Colossians, Ephesians, and Philemon as interrelated documents written at different levels of moral discourse. Colossians is first-order moral discourse (the opening gambit), Ephesians is second-order moral discourse (what one says after the opening salvo to the same audience), and Philemon is third-order moral discourse (what one says to a personal friend or intimate). Witherington successfully analyzes these documents as examples of Asiatic rhetoric, explaining the differences in style from earlier Pauline documents. He further shows that Paul is deliberately engaging in the transformation of existing social institutions.

As always, Witherington's work is scholarly and engaging. With detailed "Closer Look" sections, The Letters to Philemon, the Colossians, and the Ephesians is perfect for the libraries of clergy, biblical scholars, and seminaries.
 

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Contents

II
1
III
4
IV
10
V
11
VI
19
VII
21
VIII
37
IX
51
XXXIV
174
XXXV
175
XXXVI
181
XXXVII
183
XXXVIII
188
XXXIX
197
XL
201
XLI
208

X
53
XI
57
XII
62
XIII
65
XIV
68
XV
82
XVI
87
XVII
91
XVIII
93
XIX
99
XX
100
XXI
103
XXII
107
XXIII
111
XXIV
113
XXV
115
XXVI
118
XXVII
128
XXVIII
130
XXIX
137
XXX
142
XXXI
151
XXXII
164
XXXIII
168
XLII
215
XLIII
217
XLIV
219
XLV
223
XLVI
225
XLVII
227
XLVIII
232
XLIX
238
L
247
LI
250
LII
270
LIII
279
LIV
283
LV
288
LVI
293
LVII
302
LVIII
313
LIX
319
LX
344
LXI
356
LXII
359
LXIII
366
LXIV
370
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