Every man his own gardener: being a new, and much more complete gardener's kalendar, and general director, than any one hitherto published ...

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Printed for J. F. and C. Rivington, 1787 - Gardening - 616 pages
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Page 295 - ... summer pruning and training, it must now be done. This work should be commenced in the beginning of the month, and followed with the utmost diligence till the whole be completed ; for were these trees suffered to remain long in the wild confused manner, that they naturally grow into at this season, it would not only prove detrimental, in a great degree, to the trees, but would also very much retard the growth and ripening of their fruit.
Page 10 - ... frame, of one or two lights, may be sufficient for supply of a moderate family ; and in general about two feet thick of dung ; set on the frame, and lay about four or five inches depth of earth on the bed, ready for planting. Then having some roots of common spear-mint, place them upon the surface, pretty thick, and cover them with earth about an inch .and a half deep ; or may place the roots in drills, and draw the earth over them. The mint will appear in about a week or fortnight, and will...
Page 381 - ... then plant them twelve inches each way from one another. Water them as soon as planted : and in dry weather let the waterings be repeated once every two or three days until the plants have taken root. The endive, which was planted out in June and July, •will, in this month, be full grown, and the plants should be tied up to promote their blanching. Choose a dry day to do this work ; then get...
Page 132 - ... place the roots in the drills, cover them about an inch deep with the earth, and then rake the ground. But when the above...
Page 119 - There should be some both of the salmon and short-top kinds, sown at three different times this month ; that is, at the beginning, middle, and latter end ; by which means there will be a due succession of young radishes for the table. Let this seed be sown now, in an open compartment, observing the same method as in February, page 123.
Page 99 - ... upright side of the stock, at the back of the slope, inserting it with great exactness, as far as it is cut, with the thickest edge outwards, and so that the rind may meet exactly every way with the rind of the stock. The graft being placed, then remove the knife or wedge, taking care not to displace the graft ; this done, let it be tied and well clayed in the manner directed as above, in the work of whip or tongue-grafting. Or if...
Page 21 - ... part of their respective mother branches ; by which means you will have room to examine the shoots, and to use your knife properly. In the course of pruning these trees, be careful to select the most promising and best situated shoots at the above distances, in a regular manner, advancing, as it were, one after another, in every part of the tree, making room for them, by cutting out all the other useless or unnecessary shoots...
Page 123 - ... draw the earth into the trench over the plants, and then proceed to open another drill or trench, as before directed ; and fill and cover it in the same manner, and so on till the whole is planted ; then let the surface of the beds be raked smooth and clear from stones, etc.
Page 193 - Where there is no frame to fpare, the bed may be arched over with hoops, and covered with mats every night, and in bad weather. When the plants...
Page 140 - ... of the head ; then place the tree in the hole ; break the earth well, and throw it in equally about tne roots ; and when all is in, tread the surface gently round the tree.

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