The Practice of Oil Painting and of Drawing as Associated with it

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J.B. Lippincott, 1910 - Figure drawing - 261 pages
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Contents

II
21
III
33
IV
43
V
49
VI
55
VII
59
VIII
66
IX
81
XVII
121
XVIII
123
XIX
129
XX
140
XXI
157
XXII
168
XXIII
181
XXIV
190

X
88
XI
91
XII
95
XIII
99
XIV
105
XV
111
XVI
115
XXV
204
XXVI
216
XXVII
219
XXVIII
226
XXIX
243
XXX
249
XXXI
262

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Page 168 - may be thought requisite. They have substance ; it is necessary, however, to keep them pure. This is effected by laying each tint in its place, and the various tints next each other, so that by a slight blending with the brush they may be softened,
Page v - THE PRACTICE OF OIL PAINTING AND OF DRAWING AS ASSOCIATED WITH IT BY SOLOMON J. SOLOMON,
Page 198 - burnt sienna, raw umber and black. Some used warmer browns than others. This work dry, they went all over the canvas with raw sienna, or raw sienna cooled to a kind of dun colour. " The blues of the sky were thinly painted over this ground after it was thoroughly dry. By looking carefully into
Page 167 - There are just two methods for the painting of light which are technically perfect. One is the translucent process of Van Eyck, the other the manner taught in the school of Rubens.
Page 168 - allowed to dull the perfect transparency and golden warmth of your shadows, your colouring will
Page 40 - anything approaching the regularity of the classic figures. Still, underlying all our personal observations, there is a consciousness more or less developed of the " perfect," for when we talk of a man with a long nose, of a woman with a short aristocratic
Page 40 - from the base of the nose to the end of the chin,
Page 54 - We have seen that if the linear draughtsman made his lines right in length and direction, the areas enclosed by them must of necessity be the correct areas ; although he may never have given them a thought.
Page 213 - Greuze was fond of dead colouring in full impasto, which he glazed all over ; afterwards painting upon the glaze when it was dry, beginning with the lights and proceeding gradually to the shadows.
Page 198 - and you will not fail to see it all through the rest of the picture. " It is more apparent as it comes to the foreground, which is, in fact, almost left as

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