A struggle for fame, Volume 2

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1883
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Page 133 - There never yet lived a wise man who wished women to turn artists, or actresses, or authors; and Mr Lacere, theoretically at least, was a wise man. By some subtle intuition he knew Glen would be far happier if she never gained a hearing - if she laid aside her manuscripts as a child lays aside its toys which have pleased it a while, and betook herself to the business of life, as such business usually presents itself to her sex, taking her pleasure while she could, mixing with other young people,...
Page 157 - ... four days later he preached his first sermon in St. George's Chapel as curate-in-charge. This was the beginning of a ministry which lasted seven years. One reason why he had hesitated to accept the charge of St. George's was that he feared he might prove in his own experience that a prophet is not without honour save in his own country, and amongst his own people.
Page 157 - ... with new beauty ; in which also we shall find the very discipline we need in order that we may be wholly purged from sin and imperfection ; in which we may undo much that we have done wrongly, do again and with perfect grace that which we have done imperfectly, become what we have wished and aimed to be, achieve what we have longed to achieve, attain the wisdom, the gifts and powers and graces to which we have aspired : in which, above all, we may be engaged in errands of usefulness and compassion...
Page 231 - ... wonder. But often repeated, it ceases to excite surprise, yet the thing itself is unchanged. The dead rising, the deaf hearing, the blind seeing, when commanded by Christ or in his name, were miraculous occurrences. But if this had continued, if every time a dead man was told in that name to rise, or a deaf man to hear, or a blind man to see, he had obeyed, no more surprise or wonder would be excited than now that men wake from sleep. It would be simply the way in which Nature works. So far,...
Page 195 - s poor and my judgment 's bad when it comes to helping anybody in distress. If you see that I can be of any use, pass me the word on the quiet, will you?" With that he went on his way, his hat tipped far to the back of his head, his hands deep in his pockets, the smoke of his pipe rising in a tranquil cloud. For once he found Mark idle, sitting disconsolate on the bench beside his cabin door. " I hoped you 'd come, " Mark said. "I 've got to talk to you.
Page 156 - ... which all that is pure and noble and kind in us will develop into new vigour and clothe itself with new beauty ; in which also we shall find the very discipline we need in order that we may be wholly purged from sin and imperfection ; in which we may undo much that we have done wrongly, do again and with perfect grace that which we have done imperfectly, become what we have wished and aimed to be, achieve what we have longed to achieve, attain the wisdom, the gifts and powers and graces to which...
Page 12 - I cannot do it, if that is what you mean." " Yes ; that is what I mean,
Page 122 - ... she covered her face with her hands, and cried as if her heart would break, after which exercise she arose refreshed, and went once more out into the street to pursue her dreary task.
Page 192 - I — suppose that you were me— suppose we both were somebody else — I wonder who it would be...
Page 330 - He had suggested she should put on her bonnet and walk part of the way back with him. ' They seem inclined to make a great fuss over their new sister-inlaw.

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