Muslim Architecture of South India: The Sultanate of Ma'bar and the Traditions of the Maritime Settlers on the Malabar and Coromandel Coasts (Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Goa)

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Psychology Press, 2003 - Architecture - 341 pages
This book reinterprets the Muslim architecture and urban planning of South India, looking beyond the Deccan to the regions of Tamil Nadu and Kerala - the historic coasts of Coromandel and Malabar. For the first time a detailed survey of the Muslim monuments of the historic ports and towns demonstrates a rich and diverse architectural tradition entirely independent from the better known architecture of North India and the Deccan sultanates. The book, extensively illustrated with photographs and architectural drawings, widens the horizons of our understanding of Muslim India and will no doubt pave new paths for future studies in the field.
 

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Contents

PREFACE
1
MADURA AND THE SULTANATE OF MABAR
23
KAYALPATNAM THE RENOWNED MUSLIM PORT OF QAIL
67
AN OVERVIEW OF THE ISLAMIC ARCHITECTURE OF MABAR
131
the Jami Mosque
138
Other mosques and the Dargah of Sayyid
200
COCHIN
211
A CROSSROADS WITH SOUTHEAST ASIA AND BEYOND
247
Inscription of Shams aldln Adil Shah at Madura
269
Inscribed epitaphs of Kayalpatnam
275
Quranic texts and translations
291
The Jami mosque of Gulbarga
299
LIST OF FIGURES
305
BIBLIOGRAPHY
321
INDEX
331
Copyright

PONDA
253

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About the author (2003)

Mehrdad Shokoohy is an architect and specialist in the conservations of urban environments. He is Chair of Architecture and Urban Studies at the University of Greenwich, and has a particular interest in the architecture and planning of the Middle East, South and Central Asia. His expertise extends to the fields of literature, history, archaeology, epigraphy and numismatics of these regions. For his contributions to South Asian studies he has been awarded the Degree of Doctor of Science by Heriot-Watt University and the Edinburgh College of Art.

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