Semiosis in Hindustani Music

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Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 2001 - Hindustani music - 396 pages
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For thousands of years music in India has been considered a signifying art. Indian music creates and represents meanings of all kings, some of which extend outwardly to the cosmos, while others arise inwardly, in the refined feelings which a musical connoisseur experiences when listening to it. In this book the author explores signification in Hindustani classical music along a two-fold path. Martineq first constructs a theory of musical semiotics based on the sign-theories of Charles Sanders Peirce. He then applies his theory to the analysis of various types of Hindustani music and how they generate significations. The author engages such fundamental issues as sound quality, raga, tala and form, while advancing his unique interpretations of well-known semiotic phenomena like iconicity, metalanguage, indexicality, symbolism, Martinez`s study also provides deep insight into semiotic issues of musical perception, performance, scholarship, and composition. An specially innovative and extensive section of the book analyzes representations in Hindustani music in terms of the Indian aesthetic theory of rasa. The evolution of the rasa system as applied to musical structures is traced historically and analyzed semiotically. In the light of Martinez`s theories, Hindustani music reveals itself to be both a delightfully sensuous and highly sophisticated system of acoustic representations.
 

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Contents

The Signification of Indian Music
1
Three early ragaragim systems 275
2
Seegers unified field theory
17
Seegers universe of value
19
Tarastis three dimensional mode
26
3
31
Tarastis model of musicological cognition
32
Hattens model of growth in a musical style
36
Ragas derived from pancama and their meanings BD
254
Ragas derived from kaisika and their meanings BD
255
Hindola and its derived ragas
265
Suddhapancama and its derived ragas
266
4
271
Raga suddhabhairava ragims and putras
274
Raginr saurastn RV 4 41
290
Raginr bhupalT RV 4 36
291

Conclusion 369
56
Schaeffers classification of sound characters
58
The logic of the categories
63
Bibliography 377
69
Sign diagrams
71
Levels of representation
72
The immediate interpretant
74
The determination of a dynamical interpretant
75
The final interpretant
79
Structure of cautal and ektal
93
Raga malkauiis according to Bhatkhande
99
Khay Jhanana jhanana
114
Ganesa Paran oral tradition according to Probir Mittra
121
Chayas in maru bihag
131
Dhrupad addressed to Emperor Akbar
139
Raga darbari kanhda mukhya aiig
163
MasitkhanT gat in raga malkauiis
183
Tagores Jadi tor dak
190
3
228
Jati system a generative diagram
229
Jatis representing spigara arhsa m p
236
2
245
The seven primary gramaragas
246
Raginr dhanasn RV 4 31
292
Raginr varatr RV 3 46
293
Raginr saindhavr RV 4 33
294
Ragim ramakrtr RV 4 20
295
Raga kalyana RV 4 33
297
Raga sn RV 4 30
298
Raga hamrmra RV 4 25
299
Raga hindolaRV 4 14
300
Raga lalita RV 4 28
301
5
302
GambhTfr ragas
318
Ragabhairavr
319
Raga sn
320
Taral or cancal ragas
321
Raga miyarh kr todT
325
Ragas komal re asavan and pilu
326
4
332
Raga hindola RV
338
Semitonal shift in hindola
344
Vilambit khayal in todT Ab More RamRam KPM
350
Aesthetic rapture as the spiral of interpretants
366
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