Benedetto Croce: An Introduction to His Philosophy

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Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1922 - Aesthetics - 315 pages
 

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Page 32 - Eleatic, Heraclitean, Socratic, Platonic, Aristotelian, Stoic, Sceptic, Neoplatonic, Christian, Buddhist, Cartesian, Spinozist, Leibnizian, Vichian, Kantian; and so on. That is to say, in the sense that no thinker and no historical movement of thought come to pass without bearing fruit, without depositing an element of truth, which forms part, consciously or no, of living modern thought.
Page 261 - We leave out of our consideration those territories which at the end of the fourteenth and the beginning of the fifteenth century...
Page 278 - More specifically, this means that: "every genuine artistic representation is itself and the universe, the universe in that individual form, and that individual form as the universe. In every...
Page 258 - ... unless we start from the principle that the spirit itself is history, maker of history at every moment of its existence, and also the result of all anterior history. Thus the spirit bears with it all its history, which coincides with itself. To forget one aspect of history and to remember another one is nothing but the rhythm of the life of the spirit, which operates by determining and individualizing itself, and by always rendering indeterminate and disindividualizing previous determinations...
Page 256 - ... distinction and the unity of the terms. Thus to talk of a history of which the documents are lacking would appear to be as extravagant as to talk of the existence of something as to which it is also affirmed that it is without one of the essential conditions of existence. A history without relation to the document •would be an unverifiable history ; and since the reality of history lies in this verifiability, and the narrative in which it is given concrete form is historical narrative only...
Page 9 - ... I had lost the guidance of a religious doctrine, and at the same time I was feeling the obscure danger of materialistic theories, whether sensistic or associationistic, about which I had no illusions at all, as^ I clearly perceived in them the substantial negation of morality itself, resolved into more or less disguised egotism. Herbart's ethics taught by Labriola restored in my mind the majesty of the ideal, of that which has to be as opposed to that which is, and mysterious in its opposition...
Page 72 - That intercourse with the literature of Marxism, and the eagerness with which for some time I followed the socialistic press of Germany and Italy, stirred my whole being, and for the first time awakened in me a feeling of political enthusiasm...
Page 144 - ... eighteenth century particularly affected by children; second, though it was not, perhaps, exactly a model to be followed, it was at least a source of inspiration to later writers. It was the first book for children in which moral contrast, which was pushed to so extreme and almost intolerable a verge at the end of the last and the beginning of this century, was availed of unsparingly. Harry Sandford and Tommy Merton are two boys diametrically opposite in birth, in breeding, in virtue, in every...
Page 32 - That is, in the sense that no thinker, and no historical movement of thought, can have passed without fruit, without leaving behind an element of truth, which is an either conscious or unconscious part of living and modern thought. A Hegelian, in the meaning of a servile and bigoted follower, professing to accept every word of the master, or of a religious sectarian, who considers dissension as a sin, no sane person wants to be, and no more I. Hegel has discovered, as others have done, one phase...
Page 82 - a simple, albeit a fruitful, canon of historical interpretation." (3) That the "appraisement of social programs must be a matter of empirical observations and practical convictions, in which connection the Marxian program cannot but appear one of the noblest and boldest and also one of those which obtain most support from the objective conditions of existing society.

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