The Aerial Age: A Thousand Miles by Airship Over the Atlantic Ocean; Airship Voyages Over the Polar Sea; the Past, the Present and the Future of Aerial Navigation (Google eBook)

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A.R. Keller & Company, 1911 - Aeronautics - 448 pages
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Page 356 - ... more than twenty-four hours at the outside. Our sudden flight aloft this morning cost us an immense amount of gas, and to an airship gas is lifeblood. The America will die from sheer exhaustion, a sort of bleeding to death, and before the last comes we must take to the boat. You must never cross the Atlantic in an airship without a cat. We have found our cat more useful to us than any barometer. He is sitting on the sail of the lifeboat now as I write, washing his face in the sun, a pleasant...
Page 88 - ... practically, a campaign of 100 or 115 days, beginning in the midst of the Arctic winter and ending at the commencing of summer. The man who can get his base established just right ; who can so organize his party and so arrange his weights and his motive power as to be able to cover an average of ten miles a day, and who can manage to avert all serious accidents, has the Pole within his grasp. Ten miles a day, a mile an hour, seems very little. But try it once, if you want to know how difficult...
Page 85 - It is only by sledging that any one now proposes to reach the North Pole. The old idea of an open polar sea and the navigation of the very top of our earth in a ship is abandoned. After Andree's disastrous attempt to find a royal aeronautic road to the Pole, no one else is likely to try that method.
Page 106 - ... feet and all around us the ice was shaking and breaking — here pushing up, there sinking down — and the violently agitated sea was spouting through the openings. We were caught in an ice-quake. For a few moments, oddly enough, we did not fully realize our danger. To none of us was an ice-pressure a new thing, and familiarity had doubtless bred in us, if not contempt for the ice-king, certainly a somewhat superfluous confidence in ourselves. But when, a few moments later, the very pieces of...
Page 83 - I want to make sure the bears and foxes don't get him," he said. Though only a sailorman, Paul Bjoervig has a great love for poetry. There are few good bits of verse in the Scandinavian languages with which he is not familiar. He has an extraordinary memory, too, and he told us that in his long vigil through those two dark and dreadful months he had calmed and comforted himself by reciting aloud, over and over, all the poetry he could remember. He did not admit, but nevertheless we...
Page 87 - Two pounds a day is the minimum ration per man, of the most approved modern "condensed" food. This means 200 pounds per man for a journey of 100 days, to say nothing of weight of sledges, instruments, tent, fuel, sleeping-bags, and packing. With the help of dogs this much may be carried, and the period of absence from land may be extended to 125 or even 140 days, though at first the loads will be very heavy. If, however, a party sets out upon a journey of nine months...
Page 106 - ... to forty-five degrees ; when our entire camp started revolving as if it were in a maelstrom ; when we saw our tent, sleeping-bags, and cookingkit threatened with destruction by a rushing mass of sludge and water, we knew that whatever was to be done must be done right quickly. There was no panic. There was not the slightest sign that any one of us was even excited. We cut the harnesses of such dogs as we could get at, that 'they might save themselves. In the very nick of time three of us sprang...
Page 297 - It was a close call. From the lifeboat we looked almost straight down upon the schooner's deck, where we could see men running to and fro, but the noise of our exhaust drowned their voices. If we were astonished, what must have been the feelings of the skipper and his crew when they saw a great dark, whirring, chugging thing rise like a monster upon them out of the murky air?
Page 106 - ... maelstrom ; when we saw our tent, sleeping-bags, and cookingkit threatened with destruction by a rushing mass of sludge and water, we knew that whatever was to be done must be done right quickly. There was no panic. There was not the slightest sign that any one of us was even excited. We cut the harnesses of such dogs as we could get at, that 'they might save themselves. In the very nick of time three of us sprang out upon the floe which held the tent, tilted though it was with one edge down...
Page 96 - THE ARCTIC TRAVELER'S GREATEST HARDSHIP. Of course we had our fair share of suffering on this sledge journey. The cold is not the worst — that is, directly: so far as actually feeling cold was concerned, we had no trouble, and a few frost-bites didn't count. Hardest to endure was the indirect effect of the cold, coupled with the absence of a fire to dry things. The camping hour arrives. You have been working hard all day, pulling and tugging, in a temperature ranging from twentyfive to forty-five...

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