The Gangs of New York: An Informal History of the Underworld

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Vintage Books, Jul 1, 2008 - History - 366 pages
112 Reviews
First published in 1928, Herbert Asbury's whirlwind tour through the low-life of nineteenth-century New York has become an indispensible classic of urban history.

Focusing on the saloon halls, gambling dens, and winding alleys of the Bowery and the notorious Five Points district, The Gangs of New York dramatically evokes the destitution and shocking violence of a turbulent era, when colorfully named criminals like Dandy John Dolan, Bill the Butcher, and Hell-Cat Maggie lurked in the shadows, and infamous gangs like the Plug Uglies, the Dead Rabbits, and the Bowery Boys ruled the streets. A rogues gallery of prostitutes, pimps, poisoners, pickpockets, murderers, and thieves, The Gangs of New York is a dramatic and entertaining glimpse at a city's dark past.
 

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Review: The Gangs of New York (The Gangs of New York #1)

User Review  - Sean Chick - Goodreads

I enjoyed Asbury's book on New Orleans, in part because I am from there, but also he offered a wide purvey of criminal activities: dueling, piracy, prostitution, gambling, violence, etc. Here it is ... Read full review

Review: The Gangs of New York (The Gangs of New York #1)

User Review  - Idowhatshewants - Goodreads

not going to finish. too highly fictionized for me Read full review

All 41 reviews »

Contents

The Cradle of the Gangs
1
II
19
III
42
V
57
V
79
VI
92
VII
108
VIII
135
X
185
XI
206
XII
228
XIII
253
XIV
277
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Herbert Asbury, an early 20th-century journalist, made a name for himself by documenting the gangs, pimps, prostitutes, and thieves that thrived in the underbellies of New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and New Orleans. His works, still in print after sevety-five years, are often hailed as the best snapshots of their time period. The Gangs of New York was the basis of Martin Scorcese's 2003 film.

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