Caesar's Gallic War

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Scott, Foresman and Company, 1907 - Gaul - 501 pages
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Page 333 - But each of the cases (except the vocative) expresses more than one thing. Consequently one must know just what uses each case can have, and must then determine which one of these uses it has in the sentence in which it occurs. This can be determined sometimes by the meaning of the word itself, sometimes by the obvious meaning of the sentence, sometimes by the fact that another word needs a certain case to satisfy its meaning and that case appears but once in the sentence. Examples: the accusative...
Page 307 - ... (intra, prep., in, within) interior, intimus, inner, inmost. (prae, prep., before) prior, primus, former, first. (prope, adv., near) propior, proximus, nearer, next.
Page 363 - Example: cur dubitem? why should I doubt? 211. A rhetorical question is one which is used for rhetorical effect and which expects no answer. Any of the above questions may be either rhetorical or real. The rhetorical character of the question has no effect on the mode. The opening sentences of Cicero's first oration against Catiline are rhetorical questions.
Page 378 - ... is usually in the indicative, the imperfect for present time, the perfect or pluperfect for past time. The condition requires the subjunctive, like any other condition contrary to fact. This is because the conclusion is not usually really contrary to fact, though the English idiom makes it seem so. When the conclusion is really contrary to fact, the subjunctive is used. Examples: si fortis esset pugnare poterat, if he were brave he could fight (he has the power in any case : hence the indicative)...
Page 329 - I was about to praise, I intended to praise, etc. 76. The passive periphrastic conjugation expresses obligation or necessity. It is formed by combining the future passive participle with the verb sum : thus, Pres. laudandus sum, / am to be (must be) praised, I have io be praised.
Page 381 - Indirect discourse repeats a remark or thought with such changes in the words as to make of it a dependent construction. Example: he said that the soldiers were brave. Indirect discourse may quote a long speech consisting of separate sentences, and periods may be used between these sentences; but, none the less, each sentence is to be thought of as depending on a verb of saying or thinking, which may be either expressed or implied at the beginning. When one speaks of a principal clause in indirect...
Page 331 - Example: laudaiJ coeptus est, he began to be praised. 87. IMPERSONAL VERBS Impersonal verbs correspond to English impersonals with it. They have no personal subject, but most of them take as subject a substantive clause or sometimes a neuter pronoun. They appear only in the third person singular of the indicative...
Page 338 - The Indirect Object With Intransitive Verbs. The dative is used with many intransitive verbs, most of which seem to be transitive in English. It must often be translated by the English direct object. (For the indirect object with intransitive verbs...
Page 28 - Helvetii reliquos Gallos virtute praecedunt, the Helvetians surpass the rest of the Gauls in courage. ABLATIVE OF DESCRIPTION 77. The ablative modified by an adjective may be used to describe a person or thing. Homo magna virtute, a man of great courage. NOTE. — In many phrases, such as the example given above, either the ablative or the genitive of description (44) may be used. But physical characteristics are usually expressed by the ablative, and measure always by the genitive. ABLATIVE OF CAUSE...
Page 357 - I still am." English expresses one of them; Latin, like French and German, expresses the other. c. For the present with dum, etc., see 234, a. 191. The Imperfect puts the action in the past and represents it as going on at that time. See 189. Example: laudabat, he was praising. a. The imperfect is often used of repeated past action; as laudabat, he used to praise, or he kept praising. It is less often used of attempted past action; as laudabat, he tried to praise. b. With the expressions mentioned...

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