Lectures on Literature

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Dec 5, 2017 - Literary Criticism - 416 pages
3 Reviews
For two decades, first at Wellesley and then at Cornell, Nabokov introduced undergraduates to the delights of great fiction. Here, collected for the first time, are his famous lectures, which include Mansfield Park, Bleak House, and Ulysses. Edited and with a Foreword by Fredson Bowers; Introduction by John Updike; illustrations.
 

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LECTURES ON RUSSIAN LITERATURE

User Review  - Kirkus

These 1950s Cornell lectures address a subject on which you would expect Nabokov to be nonpareil. And indeed things start off in brisk, trumpeting fashion, with a 1958 overview entitled "Russian ... Read full review

LECTURES ON LITERATURE

User Review  - Kirkus

Not really essays, not genial and general E. M. Forster-ish talks either, nor stirring defenses nor rhetorical destructions, these lectures Nabokov prepared and gave at Cornell in the Fifties are just ... Read full review

Contents

Mansfield Park
9
Bleak House
63
Madame Bovary
125
The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
179
The Walk by Swanns Place
207
The Metamorphosis
251
Ulysses
285
Back Matter
371
Back Cover
387
Spine
388
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About the author (2017)

Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born poet, novelist, literary critic, translator, and essayist was awarded the National Medal for Literature for his life's work in 1973. He taught literature at Wellesley, Stanford, Cornell, and Harvard. He is the author of many works including Lolita, Pale Fire, Ada, and Speak, Memory.

John Updike is the author of numerous books, including the acclaimed "Rabbit" novels, Couples, In the Beauty of the Lilies, and Bech at Bay. He has won the National Book Award, the Pulitzer Prize, the American Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the William Dean Howells Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In 1998 he received the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

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