Clement and the Early Church of Rome: On the Dating of Clement's First Epistle to the Corinthians

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Emmaus Road Publishing, 2010 - Religion - 130 pages

Clement of Rome's First Epistle to the Corinthians, one of the very few Christian texts having survived from the first century, is a supremely valuable historical document. Modern scholars affirm as much, although many have called into question whether Clement was a direct disciple of Sts. Peter and Paul, arguing instead that he lived and wrote many decades after the martyrdom of the apostles. In the groundbreaking Clement and the Early Church of Rome: On the Dating of Clement's First Epistle to the Corinthians, Msgr. Thomas J. Herron presents his rigorously researched conclusions and sketches out the significance of his findings. Clement's Epistle stands as an early example of the exercise of hierarchical--and Roman--authority in the Church. It is a disciplinary letter addressed with confident authority to a distant Church.

About the Author
Msgr. Thomas J. Herron served for many years as an official of the Vatican Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. He was the English-language secretary for Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, who later became Pope Benedict XVI. Msgr. Herron held a doctorate in biblical theology from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. Later in life, he taught at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary and served as a pastor in Philadelphia. He died of pancreatic cancer in 2004.

Endorsements

"His methods are rigorous. His writing is clear and unflinchingly honest. His tone is modest. Nevertheless, his conclusions are stunning. He argues very persuasively for the earlier dates; and then he proceeds to sketch out the significance of the early dating for history, theology, and apologetics. Did he succeed? Well, his work has been cited as authoritative by scholars as illustrious as Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger. And His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI is certainly not alone."

--Scott Hahn, Bestselling Author and Popular Speaker

"I am dependent . . . upon the brilliant analysis by Thomas J. Herron."

--Dr. Clayton Jefford, St. Meinrad School of Theology, author of The Apostolic Fathers and the New Testament

 

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Contents

Introduction General Background of the Question
1
Chapter One The Internal Evidence
11
A The Text
12
B Commentary
13
1
21
3
28
14 Those nearest to us of our own generation 1 Clement 5
31
3
35
H Apostolic Succession
68
1 Summary
70
A The Didache
71
B The Epistles of Ignatius
74
C Summary
78
Theological Implications of an Earlier Dating Hypothesis
79
B The New Testament in an Earlier 1 Clement
81
C First Clements Relationship with the Apostles Peter and Paul
82

6
36
3
37
1
39
110 Conclusion
40
The New Testament and the Apostolic Fathers
43
A The AntiTemple Polemic
45
B The Suffering Servant
47
C Jesus Christ as High Priest
52
E AttootoAoc
58
F EmoKonocTTpsofiuTepoc
60
G Eschatology
64
D The Episcopate and Presbyterate in an Earlier 1 Clement
84
E The Implications for Determining 1 Clements Position on Roman Primacy and Papacy
87
32A A Theology of Ecclesiastical Office
88
B Pluralism in the Early Church
90
C Christian Eschatology
92
E Implications of an Early Date ofi Clement for Early Church Historiography eg Eusebius of Caesarea
93
33 Conclusion
94
External Evidence for an Early Clement
97
Selected Bibliography
103
4 Miscellaneous
116
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