The Beauties of Sterne: Containing All His Pathetic Tales, His Humorous Descriptions, His Most Distinguished Observations on Life, and a Copious Selection from His Sermons ... (Google eBook)

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J. Sharpe, 1810 - English literature - 252 pages
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Page 53 - ... head, notched all over with the dismal days and nights he had passed there : — he had one of these little sticks in his hand, and with a rusty nail he was etching another day of misery to add to the heap. As I darkened the little light he had, he lifted up a hopeless eye towards the door, then cast it down, — shook his head, and went on with his work of affliction.
Page 29 - Fevre, which were waxing cold and slow within him, and were retreating to their last citadel, the heart, — rallied back, — the film forsook his eyes for a moment ; — he looked up wishfully in my uncle Toby's face ; — then cast a look upon his boy ; — and that ligament, fine as it was — was never broken ! Nature instantly ebb'd again; — the film returned to its place ; — the pulse fluttered ; — stopped ; — went on,— throbbed, — stopped again; — moved, stopped. — Shall I...
Page 34 - tis an animal (be in what hurry I may) I cannot bear to strike there is a patient endurance of sufferings, wrote so unaffectedly in his looks and carriage, which pleads so mightily for him, that it always disarms me; and to that degree, that I do not like to speak unkindly to him: on the contrary, meet him where I will — whether in town or country — in cart...
Page 22 - I was answered, an' please your honour, that he had no servant with him; that he had come to the inn with hired horses, which, upon finding himself unable to proceed (to join, I suppose, the regiment), he had dismissed the morning after he came. — If I get better, my dear, said he, as he gave his purse to his son to pay the man, — we can hire horses from hence. But alas! the poor gentleman will never get from hence...
Page 28 - He shall not drop," said my uncle Toby, firmly. " A-well-o'day, do what we can for him," said Trim, maintaining his point ; " the poor soul will die." " He shall not die, by G — ," cried my uncle Toby. The accusing spirit, which flew up to heaven's chancery with the oath, blushed as he gave it in ; and the recording angel, as he wrote it down, dropped a tear upon the word, and blotted it out for ever.
Page 52 - Tis thou, thrice sweet and gracious goddess, addressing myself to Liberty, whom all in public or in private worship, whose taste is grateful, and ever will be so, till Nature herself shall change.
Page 36 - em, which I had just bought, and gave him one ; — and, at this moment that I am telling it, my heart smites me that there was more of pleasantry in the conceit of seeing how an ass would eat a macaroon than of benevolence in giving him one, which presided in the act. " When the ass had eaten his macaroon, I pressed him to come in.
Page 51 - I took to be of a child, which complained " it could not " get out" — I look'd up and down the passage, and seeing neither man, woman, nor child, I went out without further attention. In my return back through the passage, I heard the same words repeated twice over ; and looking up, I saw it was a starling hung in a little cage.—" I can't get " out,— I can't get out,
Page 116 - The sun was set — they had done their work; the nymphs had tied up their hair afresh — and the swains were preparing for a carousal — my mule made a dead point — Tis the fife and tabourin, said I — I'm frightened to death, quoth he — They are running at the ring of pleasure...
Page 117 - Tie me up this tress instantly, said Nannette, putting a piece of string into my hand — It taught me to forget I was a stranger The whole knot fell down We had been seven years acquainted. The youth struck the note upon the...

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