Days of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence

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Penguin Publishing Group, 2016 - Radicalism - 585 pages
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From the bestselling author of "Public Enemies" and "The Big Rich," an explosive account of the decade-long battle between the FBI and the homegrown revolutionary terrorists of the 1970s. The Weathermen. The Symbionese Liberation Army. The FALN. The Black Liberation Army. The names seem quaint now, when not forgotten altogether. But there was a stretch of time in America, roughly between 1968 and 1975, when there was on average more than one significant terrorist act in this country every week, and the FBI combated these groups and others as nodes in a single revolutionary underground, dedicated to the violent overthrow of the American government. The FBI's response to the leftist revolutionary counterculture has not been treated kindly by history, and it is true that in hindsight many of its efforts seem almost comically ineffectual, if not criminal in themselves. But part of the extraordinary accomplishment of Bryan Burrough's groundbreaking book is to temper those easy judgments with an understanding of just how deranged these times were, how charged with menace. Burrough re-creates an atmosphere that seems almost unbelievable just forty years later, conjuring a time of native-born radicals, most of them "nice middle-class kids," smuggling bombs into skyscrapers and detonating them inside the Pentagon and the U.S. Capitol, at a courthouse in Boston, at a Wall Street restaurant packed with lunchtime diners. Radicals who robbed dozens of banks and assassinated policemen, in New York, San Francisco, Atlanta. The FBI's fevered response included the formation of a secret task force called Squad 47, dedicated to hunting the groups down and rolling them up. But Squad 47 itself was not overly squeamish about legal niceties, and its efforts ultimately ended in fiasco. Benefiting from the extraordinary number of people from the underground and the FBI who speak about their experiences for the first time, "Days of Rage" is filled with important revelations and fresh details about the major revolutionaries and their connections and about the FBI and its desperate efforts to make the bombings stop. The result is mesmerizing and completely new--a book that takes us into the hearts and minds of homegrown terrorists and federal agents alike and weaves their stories into a spellbinding secret history of the 1970s. -- Publisher description.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dickmanikowski - LibraryThing

My memory has faded over the years. Somehow, I'd forgotten just how many revolutionary leftist groups were not only publicly protesting in the America of the late 1960s and 1970s but actually bombing ... Read full review

DAYS OF RAGE: America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A stirring history of that bad time, 45-odd years ago, when we didn't need a weatherman to know which way the wind was blowing, though we knew it was loud.The 1970s, writes Vanity Fair special ... Read full review

Contents

win EGROES WITH GUNS
26
v0U SAY YOU WANT A REVOLUTION
55
AS TO KILLING PEOPLE WE WERE PREPARED TODO THAT
87
THE TOWNHOUSE
101
THE WRONG SIDE OF HISTORY
152
THE BLACKLIBERATION ARMY
173
WE GOT PRETTY SMALL
218
BLOOD IN THE STREETS OF BABYLON
236
HARD TIMES
361
WELCOME TO FEAR CITY
380
ARMED REVOLUTIONARY LOVE
407
BOMBS AND DIAPERS
425
THE FAMILY
447
JAILBREAKS AND CAPTURES
471
THE SCALES OF JUSTICE
492
THE LAST REVOLUTIONARIES
513

THE DRAGON UNLEASHED
259
PATTY HAS BEEN KIDNAPPED
284
WHAT PATTY HEARST WROUGHT
304
THE BELFAST OF NORTH AMERICA
333
EPILOGUE 537
537
A NOTE ON SOURCES 553
553
INDEX 569
569
Copyright

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About the author (2016)

Bryan Burrough is a special correspondent at Vanity Fair and the author of five previous books, including The Big Rich and Public Enemies. A former reporter for the Wall Street Journal, he is a three-time winner of the Gerald Loeb Award for excellence in financial journalism.

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