The American Common-school Reader and Speaker: Being a Selection of Pieces in Prose and Verse, with Rules for Reading and Speaking

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John Goldsbury, William Russell
Tappan, Whittemore and Mason, 1844 - American literature - 432 pages
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Contents

The American Eagle C W Thomson
133
The Lajl Evening before Eternity J A Hillhocse ITS 43 Character of Jesue S C Thacher 30
138
The Treadmill Song O W Holmes HO 46 Darkness _ Byron
141
rjnj Dertluimn 113
147
Wonier Van Twiller Washington Irving 19
149
Invocation of Mirth M
151
Marco Boiiaria F O Hali ece 62
159
Palmyra Wiu iam Ware
161
Beautiesor Nature Samuel G Howe
162
An Interestine Adventure William J Snellinh
163
Thoughts on Politeness Geo S Hillard
166
Same Subject concluded io 62 Cottage on the Swiss Alps Buceminster 68
168
Peter Sluyvesant Washington Irving 69
174
Tho Spirit of Poetry H W Ingfellow
175
The Soldiers Widow N P Wau
176
The Sicilian Vuspers J G Whither
177
Mexican Mythology Wm H Prescott
178
The true Greatness of our Country W H Seward
180
Zenobiaa Ambition William Ware
181
Trials of the Poet and the Scholar Geo S Hillard
183
The Yankees Samuel Kettel
184
Custom of Whitewashing Framcw Hofrinson
185
Same Subject continued JD J 77 Same Subject concluded to Jjj 78 The Force of Curiosity Charles SpRAOOR
191
The Winds w Bryant
193
Daybreak RtcHARD H Dana Sen
194
The Light of Home Ms S J Hale
196
A Psalm of Life H W Longfellow 97
197
To the Condor FltBT j 84 A Child carried away by an Eagle Proauor Wilton
199
Same Subject concluded _ Sji 86 Scene at the Dedication of a Heathen Temple William Warm
204
Same Subject continued JD fJZ 88 Same Subject concluded _
206
Hamilton and Jay Dr Hawrs
207
Adams and Jefferson Daniel Weester
209
The Destiny of our Republic B 8 Hillard ill 92 Posthumous Innuence of the Wise and Good Andrews Norton
212
Look Aloa J Lawrence Jr 2 3
214
The Last Days of Autumn Henry Piceering 21 j og Tyian N Y Evening Post
216
9 Passage down the Ohio James K Paulding
217
Spirit of Beauty Rbfds Dawes 2 8
219
Tho Voices of the Dead Orville Dewey
221
Lbseon rxam 107 The Child of the Tomb W B Tapfan
230
Lore ami Kama H T Tucrerman
232
Lamentation of Rebecca the Jeweaa G Lcnt
234
Two Hundred Years Ago Grenville Mellen
235
The Stage Charles Spraoue
237
The BurialPlace at Laurel Hill W O Clarr
239
A Good Daughter J G Palpeey
240
Religion he Guardian of the Soul Orville Dewey
241
Features of American Scenerj Wm Tudor
242
Study of Human Nature essential to a Teacher G B Lmerson
243
Education IR Humphrey
245
Progress of Science Edward Everett 216
246
Purpose of the BunkerHill Monument Daniel Wedster
247
21 The American Flag J R 1aee
250
The Wild Boy Charles West Thomson
253
My Native Village John H Bryant
254
The Press Joseph T Buceinuhah
255
Mount Auhurn Nbhemiah Adams 25B 12a Trying to Please Edward T Ceanning
257
Defence of Charles Greenleaf G S Hillard
258
The Genius of Aristophanes C C Fblton
259
Responsibility of Americans E S Gannett
261
The Mocking Bird Alexander Wilson
262
The Euroiiean and the American Nations Daniel Weester 2G3 134 The Times the Manners and the Men J RLowell
265
Liberty to Athens James O Percival
266
The Arsenal at Springfield H W Longfellow
267
Immortality Richard H Dana Sen
268
The Gray Old Man of tlie Mountain Harrt Hieeard
270
The Novel Reader Charles Spraoue
271
Local Associations Haer eon Gray Otis
274
Character of Julius Oaar Knowla
275
A Republican SchoolRoom A B Mubzey
279
The English Skylark Samuel H Stearns 2J 145 The Dream of Clarence Shabptan 2b2 146 New England Freedom and Enterprise Josiah Uuincy 234
284
Freedom and Progress Charles G Atherton
285
57 Benefits of Collegiate Education John Seroeant 30 1
303
Our Control over our Physical Wellbeing Horace Mann
306
Scene from Henry IV Shahyum
307
Extract from an Address delivered at Chapel Hill William Gaston
311
The Lyre Milton Ward
312
Polish War Song James b Percival
314
Belshazzar ? Orolu 3 4
316
Night in Eden Mrs E H Evans
318
The Present Age Daniel Weester
319
MS Melancholy Fate of the Indians Joseph Story
320
Edmund Burke A H Everett
322
National SelfResnect T Beman
323
Internal Improvement C Calhoun
325
Founders of our Government Wm M Richardson
326
Conduct of the Opposition Henry Clay
327
God the Creator mtl?n 175 Crescentius Mm Landon
329
Address to tin Ocean Barry Oornwall
330
The TJrm Major Hetot Ware Jr
331
The Fate of Tyranny Maion
335
The Itownfall of Poland Tlmmat Campbell
338
Napoleon at Rest John Pierpont
339
Napoleon Bonaparte Channing
340
The Thumbr Storm Washington Irving
342
Classical Learning Joseph Story
343
The BunkerHill Monument Daniel Weester
345
Appeal in Favor of the Union James Madison
346
France and England John C Calhoun
348
Appeal for Ireland Henry Clay
350
Loss of Notional Character President Maxcy
351
Lafayette and Napoleon E Everett
352
The Vision of Liberty Henry Ware Jr
354
Shakspeare Charles Sprague
356
Speech of Rienzi to the Romans Miu Mitard
357
Same Subject Thomnt Moore
359
Guslavus Vasa to the Swedes Brooke
360
A Field of Battle Shelley
361
Resistance to Oppression Patrice Henry
362
Duties of American Citizens Levi Woodeury
364
Political Corruption Geo MDuffie
366
Intelligence necessary to perpetuate Independence Judoe Dawes
367
South American Republics Daniel Weester
368
Excellence of the Holy Scriptures liealtie
370
Sir Anthony Absolute and Captain Absolute Skmdan
372
S01 Antonys Address to the Roman Populace Shakspeare
375
The Victor Angela Milton
377
Impressment of American Seamen Henry Clay
378
New England what is she 1 Tristam Bulges
379
Parly Spirit William Gaston
381
Restless Spirit of Man Wileur Fisr
383
Rectitude of Character William Wirt
385
Washington Daniel Weester
386
Public Faith Fisher Ames 338
390
The Study of Elocution necessary for a Preacher Prof Parr
391
Relief of Revolutionary Officers Martin Van Buren
393
Rapacity and Barbarity ofa British Soldiery Livingston
394
Free Navigation of the Mississippi Gouverneur Morris
395
Our Duties to our Country Daniel Weester
397
England and the United States E Everett
399
Massachusetts and New York Gov Seward 4fJ2
402
The Bible i Thos S Grimre
404
Fato of Montezuma Wm H Prescott
405
Scenery about Hassen Cleaver Hills John A Clare
407
The Treasure that Waxeth not Old D Huntington
409
The Young Mariners Dream Dtmond
410
Guslavus Vasa and Cristiern Brooke
411
Tamerlane and Bajazet Howe
414
An Independent Judiciary Jamie A Bayard
417
Momorlals of Washington and Franklin J Q Adams
419
Dialogue from Henry IV m Shakspeare
421
The Love of Truth George Putnam
424
Energy of the Will Thomas C Upham
428

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Popular passages

Page 16 - No sooner had the Almighty ceased, but all The multitude of angels, with a shout Loud as from numbers without number, sweet As from blest voices, uttering joy, heaven rung With jubilee, and loud hosannas filled The eternal regions...
Page 39 - Holds such an enmity with blood of man, That, swift as quicksilver, it courses through The natural gates and alleys of the body ; And, with a sudden vigour, it doth posset And curd, like eager droppings into milk, The thin and wholesome blood...
Page 375 - I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause : What cause withholds you then to mourn for him? O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts, And men have lost their reason! Bear with me; My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, And I must pause till it come back to me.
Page 291 - Mr. President, I shall enter on no encomium upon Massachusetts — she needs none. There she is — behold her, and judge for yourselves. There is her history — the world knows it by heart. The past, at least, is secure. There is Boston, and Concord, and Lexington, and Bunker Hill ; and there they will remain forever.
Page 363 - If we wish to be free — if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending — if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon, until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained — we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of Hosts is all that is left us! They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to...
Page 375 - When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honorable man. You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
Page 364 - election. If we were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest There is no retreat but in submission and slavery. Our chains are forged. Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston. The war is inevitable. And let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come ! " It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry peace, peace, but there is no peace.
Page 363 - Sir, we are not weak, if we make a proper use of those means which the God of nature hath placed in our power. Three millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us.
Page 363 - They tell us, sir, that we are weak — unable to cope with so formidable an adversary; but when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house ! Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction?
Page 376 - tis his will : Let but the commons hear this testament, (Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read) And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds, And dip their napkins in his sacred blood ; Yea, beg a hair of him for memory, And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it, as a rich legacy, Unto their issue.

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