Can Such Things Be?

Front Cover
Kessinger Publishing, Jun 1, 2004 - Fiction - 152 pages
18 Reviews
There came to them out of the fog--seemingly from a great distance--the sound of a laugh, a low, deliberate, soulless laugh which had no more of joy than that of a hyena night-prowling in the desert; a laugh that rose by slow gradation, louder and louder, clearer, more distinct and terrible, until it seemed barely outside the narrow circle of their vision; a laugh so unnatural, so unhuman, so devilish, that it filled those hardy man-hunters with a sense of dread unspeakable!

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Review: Can Such Things Be?

User Review  - Ebster Davis - Goodreads

Haita the Shepherd: 4/5. Color me impressed! I read this because its supposed to be the first featuring Hastur (aka "The King in Yellow") but he's presented as just a regular diety. Not trying to take ... Read full review

Review: Can Such Things Be?

User Review  - Goodreads

Haita the Shepherd: 4/5. Color me impressed! I read this because its supposed to be the first featuring Hastur (aka "The King in Yellow") but he's presented as just a regular diety. Not trying to take ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Ambrose Bierce was a brilliant, bitter, and cynical journalist. He is also the author of several collections of ironic epigrams and at least one powerful story, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge." Bierce was born in Ohio, where he had an unhappy childhood. He served in the Union army during the Civil War. Following the war, he moved to San Francisco, where he worked as a columnist for the newspaper the Examiner, for which he wrote a number of satirical sketches. Bierce wrote a number of horror stories, some poetry, and countless essays. He is best known, however, for The Cynic's Word Book (1906), retitled The Devil's Dictionary in 1911, a collection of such cynical definitions as "Marriage: the state or condition of a community consisting of a master, a mistress, and two slaves, making in all, two." Bierce's own marriage ended in divorce, and his life ended mysteriously. In 1913, he went to Mexico and vanished, presumably killed in the Mexican revolution.

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