Mister Rogers Tr

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Berkley Books, Jun 1, 1985 - Parenting - 315 pages
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User Review  - octavio1 - LibraryThing

This book is very helpful for those children who have a new brother. Sometimes children feel less than the new baby and for that reson they change their behavior to attach the attention. The book ... Read full review

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User Review  - Karen_Curtis_Wood - LibraryThing

A book about when a new baby joins the family. Read full review


The Early Months 24 The TwoYearOld
Parents Feelings

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About the author (1985)

Fred McFeely Rogers was born on March 20, 1928 in Pennsylvania. He was an American television personality, educator, Presbyterian minister, composer, songwriter, author, and activist. Rogers was most famous for creating, hosting, and composing the theme music for the educational preschool television series Mister Rogers' Neighborhood (1968 - 2001), which featured his gentle, soft-spoken personality. Originally he was educated to be a minister but was displeased with the way television addressed children and made an effort to change this when he began to write for and perform on local Pittsburgh-area shows dedicated to youth. WQED developed his own show in 1968 and it was distributed nationwide by Eastern Educational Television Network. Over the course of three decades on television, Fred Rogers became an indelible American icon of children's entertainment and education, as well as a symbol of compassion, patience, and morality. Rogers received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, some forty honorary degrees, and a Peabody Award. He was inducted into the Television Hall of Fame, was recognized by two Congressional resolutions, and was ranked No. 35 among TV Guide's Fifty Greatest TV Stars of All Time.[5] Several buildings and artworks in Pennsylvania are dedicated to his memory, and the Smithsonian Institution displays one of his trademark sweaters as a "Treasure of American History". Rogers was diagnosed with stomach cancer in December 2002, not long after his retirement. He underwent surgery on January 6, 2003, which was unsuccessful. Rogers died on the morning of February 27, 2003, at his home with his wife by his side, less than a month before he would have turned 75.

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