Personal Beauty: How to Cultivate and Preserve it in Accordance with the Laws of Health

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W. J. Holland, 1870 - Beauty, Personal - 346 pages
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The authors approach the subject of women's appearance from the perspective of health and hygiene.
 

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Page 115 - Haste thee, nymph, and bring with thee Jest, and youthful Jollity, Quips, and cranks,* and wanton* wiles, Nods, and becks, and wreathed smiles, Such as hang on Hebe's cheek, And love to live in dimple sleek; Sport that wrinkled Care derides, And Laughter holding both his sides.
Page 149 - O! FOR my sake do you with Fortune chide The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdu'd To what it works in, like the dyer's hand...
Page 112 - STILL to be neat, still to be drest, As you were going to a feast; Still to be powdered, still perfumed; Lady, it is to be presumed, Though art's hid causes are not found, All is not sweet, all is not sound. Give me a look, give me a face, That makes simplicity a grace; Robes loosely flowing, hair as free: Such sweet neglect more taketh me Than all the adulteries of art; They strike mine eyes, but not my heart.
Page 250 - ... from the size of a pin's head to that of a pea ; scattered through a large body of sand or clay ; and in this state it is called by the Mandingoes sanoo munko,
Page 16 - Yet nature is made better by no mean, But nature makes that mean: so, o'er that art, Which you say adds to nature, is an art That nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we marry A gentler scion to the wildest stock, And make conceive a bark of baser kind By bud of nobler race: this is an art Which does mend nature, — change it rather; but The art itself is nature.
Page 256 - But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her, for her hair is given her for a covering.
Page 276 - THE PRISONER OF CHILLON. MY hair is gray, but not with years, Nor grew it white In a single night, As men's have grown from sudden fears : My limbs are bow'd, though not with toil, But rusted with a vile repose, For they have been a dungeon's spoil, And mine has been the fate of those To whom the goodly earth and air Are bann'd, and...
Page 100 - Thy neck is as a tower of ivory; thine eyes like the fishpools in Heshbon, by the gate of Bathrabbim: thy nose is as the tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus.
Page 22 - For a person of average height, it is equal to about the distance from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger, plus a hand's-breadth, the former distance being the natural cubit (for a person of such height).
Page 330 - Now, should Galen himself look out of his grave, and tell me these were baubles, below the profession of a physician, I would boldly answer him, that I take more glory in preserving God's image in its...

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