Hints for Camping and Walking: How to Camp Out

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Scribner, Armstrong,, 1877 - Camping - 134 pages
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User Review  - barringer - LibraryThing

Written circa 1890, so the equipment and the attitude toward women is out of date, but the observations and general guidelines are remarkably similar to what you read today. Read full review

Contents

I
9
II
14
III
25
IV
35
V
39
VI
44
VII
50
VIII
60
IX
72
X
78
XI
95
XII
101
XIV
105
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Page 116 - Substitute for the patient's wet clothing, if possible, such other covering as can be instantly procured, each bystander supplying a coat or cloak, etc.
Page 115 - Treat the patient instantly on the spot, in the open air, freely exposing the face, neck, and chest to the breeze, except in severe weather. 2d. In order to clear the throat, place the patient gently on the face, with one wrist under the forehead, that all fluid, and the tongue itself, may fall forward, and leave the entrance into the windpipe free. 3d. To excite respiration, turn the...
Page 108 - about compensates for the extra cooling by evaporation. Nor is a complete drenching more likely to be injurious than wetting of one part. But never sit still wet; and in changing, rub the body dry. There is a general tendency, springing from fatigue, indolence, or indifference, to neglect damp feet, — that is to say, to dry them by the fire ; but this process is tedious and uncertain. I would say especially, ' Off with muddy boots and sodden socks at once ; ' dry stockings and slippers, after a...
Page 115 - Repeat these movements deliberately and perseveringly,/i//^n times only in a minute. (When the patient lies on the thorax, this cavity is compressed by the weight of the body, and expiration takes place. When he is turned on the side, this pressure is removed, and inspiration...
Page 117 - Such is powdered mustard (a large tablespoonful in a tumblerful of warm water) . When vomiting has already taken place copious draughts of warm water should be given, to keep up the effect till the poisoning substance has been thoroughly removed.
Page 115 - When the prone position is resumed, make a uniform and efficient pressure along the spine, removing the pressure immediately, before rotation on the side. (The pressure augments the expiration, the rotation commences inspiration.) Continue these measures.
Page 115 - If not successful, lose no time ; but, to imitate respiration, place the patient on his face, and turn the body gently, but completely on the side, and a little beyond; then again on the face, and so on, alternately. Repeat these movements deliberately and perseveringly, fifteen times only in a minute.
Page 115 - ... 2d. In order to clear the throat, place the patient gently on the face, with one wrist under the forehead, that all fluid, and the tongue itself, may fall forward, and leave the entrance into the windpipe free. 3d. To excite respiration, turn the patient slightly on his side, and apply some irritating or stimulating agent to the nostrils, as veratrine, dilute ammonia, etc.
Page 116 - ... and spasms in the arms and limbs. Unless accompanied with cramp (which is not usual), nature will work its own cure. Give warm drinks, if you have them. Do not get frightened ; but keep the patient warm, and well protected from a draught of air. "In all cases of internal poisoning the first step is to evacuate the stomach.
Page 107 - I should think almost any one could get a "cold" with a spoonful of water on the wrist held to a key-hole. Singular as it may seem, sudden warming when cold is more dangerous than the reverse: every one has noticed how soon the handkerchief is required on entering a heated room on a cold day. Frost-bite is an extreme illustration of this. As the Irishman said on picking himself up, it was not the fall, but stopping so quickly, that hurt him: it is not the lowering of the temperature to freezing point,...

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