A Tale of Two Sitters

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Gareth Stevens Pub., Jan 1, 1999 - Juvenile Fiction - 144 pages
1 Review
The Adventures of Wishbone "TM" is a clever, engaging series that will immediately catch the eyes and the attention of young readers everywhere! Wishbone is an irrepressible pooch who imagines himself as major characters in classic literature as a means of working through the challenges of everyday life. Even the most reluctant readers will stand in line for a chance to read about the captivating adventures of this canine.

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A cute summary: Read the tragic story of Charles Darnay through Wishbone's eyes. It was hard imagining a dog (whiskers, tail, four legs and all) being married to dear Lucie, but that was how it went. I was also concerned about how Sydney Canton would do his part in the story, but it turned out more beautiful than I thought it could. Kudos to the author! For young readers, this is a great way to introduce to them "A Tale of Two Cities."
The other half of the story about modern-day Wishbone and his owners, the Talbots, wasn't as interesting to me. And I didn't find Wishbone's "witty comments" appealing –- at all.
 

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
11
Section 3
13
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Joanne Barkan lives in New York, NY.

Charles Dickens, perhaps the best British novelist of the Victorian era, was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England in 1812. His happy early childhood was interrupted when his father was sent to debtors' prison, and young Dickens had to go to work in a factory at age twelve. Later, he took jobs as an office boy and journalist before publishing essays and stories in the 1830s. His first novel, The Pickwick Papers, made him a famous and popular author at the age of twenty-five. Subsequent works were published serially in periodicals and cemented his reputation as a master of colorful characterization, and as a harsh critic of social evils and corrupt institutions. His many books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Expectations, A Christmas Carol, and A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, and the couple had nine children before separating in 1858 when he began a long affair with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. Despite the scandal, Dickens remained a public figure, appearing often to read his fiction. He died in 1870, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

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