The Science of Linguistics in the Art of Translation: Some Tools from Linguistics for the Analysis and Practice of Translation

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SUNY Press, 1988 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 241 pages
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Drawing from more than two hundred examples representing twenty-two languages of wide genetic and typological variety, the author guides the reader through a broad collection of situations encountered in the analysis and practice of translation. This enterprise gains structure and rigor from the methods and findings of contemporary linguistic theory, while realism and relevance are served by the choice of "naturalistic" examples from published translations. Coverage draws from a variety of genres and text-types (literary works, the Bible, newspaper articles, legal and philosophical writings, for examples), and addresses a thorough selection of structural-functional aspects. These range from discrepancies between source and target languages in sentence construction, to dfiferences between source and target poetic traditions with respect to meter and rhyme.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
013 The Art of Translation
2
021 Primary Organizational Components
3
022 Secondary Organizational Components
4
023 An Extended Illustration
5
024 Compositional Levels
7
03 Format of Tranlational Examples and Bibliographical References
8
05 List of Terms and Symbols Not Defined Elsewhere
9
Systemic and Formalistic Techniques
93
Sets and Scatters
94
SettoSet Substitution SettoScatter Equation
99
83 Japanese SelfReferent Pronouns French Dizaines versus English Dozens ScattertoSet Translation
104
84 Formal and Functional Sets
106
Notes
108
Taxonomies
111
91 Taxonomic Conflation
112

06 A Note on Terminology
11
Trajections Matching Equation and Substitution
15
112 Preliminary Examples
16
12 Equation
19
13 Substitution
20
14 Matching
22
141 Carryover Matching
23
142 Ca1que Matching Prefab Matching and False Friendship
25
Notes
27
Zigzagging Divergence and Convergence
29
211 Linguistic Cues
30
212 Situational Cues
32
213 Stylistic Cues
33
214 Artistic Suspense Stylistically Induced Divergence
34
22 Convergence
36
23 Zigzagging
37
Notes
39
Recrescence
41
312 Classificatory Amplification
45
32 Reduction
46
322 Variational Reduction
47
33 Recrescence
49
332 Global Preferences for Larger or Smaller Units
50
333 Japanese kureruyaru and Authors Empathy
51
Notes
52
Repackaging Amplification and Reduction
55
412 Definitional Diffusion
56
413 Diffusion of Grammatical Inflections
57
414 Diffusion of Sentences
58
42 Condensation
59
422 Condensation to Compensate for Syntactic Deficiency
60
431 Size Adjustments and Preferences
61
432 Repackaging and Recurrence Chains
62
Notes
63
Reordering
65
51 Reordering to Optimize Comprehension
66
52 Reordering Relative to Narrative Flow
67
53 Reordering of TargetAlien Stylistic Patterns Greek hyteronproteron
68
54 Feature Recording
69
Notes
70
Some Dimensions of Trajectional Analysis
71
Recoding
72
62 Relations Between Trajection
75
622 Hookups
78
63 Trajections as AppliedLinguistic Constructs
80
Notes
81
Some Trajectional Parameters
83
72 LinguisticStylistic Situational Parameters
84
721 The Chiaroscuro Nature of Stylistic Patterns
85
73 CompensatoryClassifactory Parameters
87
75 Positive and Negative Hookups
88
76 TranslinguisticUnilinguistic Parameters
89
Notes
90
92 Matching and Diffusional Deconflation
116
93 Nonce Conflation
118
Notes
120
Zeroes
123
102 Zeroes in the Study of Style and Textual Ambiguity
127
Notes
129
Abstract Syntactic Representations
131
112 Some Guidelines for Synthesizing Abstract Syntactic Representations ASRs
133
113 Derivations Rules and Strata of Representation
137
Notes
143
Bridge Technique
145
French tacher and Spanish rocurar versus English try
150
Antispanning Lexicalization
152
124 Situational and Stylistic Patterns
158
1243 Norwegian Word Order versus English Extraposition
160
Representational Strata and Trajections
162
Notes
165
Phonetics Phenology and Poetic Form
169
131 Cenematics and Orthometrics
172
132 Feature and Subsequence Rhyme
175
133 Two Modes of Linguistic Application
177
134 Cenematic Strata and Derivations APRs
178
Notes
182
Transduction
185
142 Alliteration in Old Irish
187
143 Transduction
189
1431 Ahi Ali Baba
190
1432 Slieve Cua
192
Notes
194
Tranjacence
195
151 Paronomasia and Other CenematicPlerematicPlerematic Complexes
196
1511 Alliterative and Rhyming Binomials
197
1512 Mimesis
198
1513 Free Association
199
1514 Eponymy
200
1521 Symbolism
203
1522 Situational Inducement
204
1524 The Distance Factor
205
1525 Authors Proclivity
206
Notes
207
Parallax
209
161 Displacement Parallax
211
162 Antipodal Parallax
212
163 Macroscopic Parallax
213
164 Microscopic Parallax
214
165 Personalizing Parallax
215
166 Depersonalizing Parallax
217
Notes
218
Bibliography
221
Index of Persons and Translational Resources
231
Index of Languages
235
Index of Subjects
237
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About the author (1988)

Joseph L. Malone is Professor of Linguistics and Departmental Chair at Barnard College, Columbia University.

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