Abridgment of the Debates of Congress, from 1789 to 1856: From Gales and Seatons' Annals of Congress; from their Register of debates; and from the official reported debates, by John C. Rives, Volume 5

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D. Appleton, 1860 - United States
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Page 27 - I consider, then, the power to annul a law of the United States, assumed by one State, incompatible with the existence of the Union, contradicted expressly by the letter of the Constitution, unauthorized by its spirit, inconsistent with every principle on which it was founded, and destructive of the great object for which it was formed.
Page 213 - ... which he is to use his own discretion, and is accountable only to his country in his political character, and to his own conscience. To aid him in the performance of these duties, he is authorized to appoint certain officers, who act by his authority, and in conformity with his orders. " In such cases their acts .are his acts ; and whatever opinion may be entertained of the manner in which Executive discretion may be used, still there exists, and can exist, no power to control that discretion....
Page 15 - States, no appeal shall be allowed to the supreme court of the United States, nor shall any copy of the record be permitted or allowed for that purpose, and that any person attempting to take such appeal shall be punished as for a contempt of court...
Page 333 - ... that all public functionaries are essentially invested with the powers of self-preservation ; that they have an inherent right to do all acts necessary to keep themselves in a condition to discharge the trusts confided to them ; that whenever authorities are given, the means of carrying them into execution are given by necessary implication ; that thus we see the British Parliament exercise the right of punishing contempts ; all the State Legislatures exercise the same power ; and every Court...
Page 30 - We, the people of the State of South Carolina, in convention assembled, do declare and ordain, and it is hereby declared and ordained, that the ordinance adopted by us, in convention, on the 23d day of May, in the year of our Lord 1788, whereby the constitution of the United States of America...
Page 213 - By the constitution of the United States the president is invested with certain important political powers, in the exercise of which he is to use his own discretion, and is accountable only to his country in his political character, and to his own conscience.
Page 259 - He never stooped to the arena of partisan discussions, but in the consideration of important subjects, especially that of the removal of the public deposits from the Bank of the United States, he proved himself to be a statesman of high rank, and a most accomplished debater.
Page 30 - State will thenceforth hold themselves absolved from all further obligation to maintain or preserve their political connection with the people of the other States, and will forthwith proceed to organize a separate Government, and do all other acts and things, which sovereign and independent States may of right do.
Page 27 - The judicial power shall extend to all cases in law and equity arising under the constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority...
Page 318 - ... powers of government which it has ordained and established, destructive of the checks and safeguards by which those powers were intended on the one hand to be controlled and on the other to be protected, and calculated by their immediate and collateral effects, by their character and tendency, to concentrate in the hands of a body not directly amenable to the people a degree of influence and power dangerous to their liberties and fatal to the Constitution of their choice.

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