Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith, with a life and notes by Richard lord Braybrooke, Volume 1

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Nat. lib. Company, 1854
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Page 109 - I did send for a cup of tee/ (a China drink) of which I never had drank before...
Page 113 - I went out to Charing Cross to see Major-general Harrison hanged, drawn, and quartered ; which was done there, he looking as cheerful as any man could do in that condition.
Page 1 - The condition of the State was thus : viz., the Rump, after being disturbed by my Lord Lambert, was lately returned to sit again. The officers of the Army all forced to yield. Lawson lies still in the river, and Monk is with his army in Scotland.
Page 124 - Moone, who is said to be the best actor in the world, lately come over with the King, and indeed it is the finest play-house, I believe^ that ever was in England.
Page 428 - These volumes have the fascination of romance united to the integrity of history. The work is written by a lady of considerable learning, indefatigable industry, and careful judgment. All these qualifications for a biographer and an historian she has brought to bear upon the subject of her volumes, and from them has resulted a narrative interesting to all, and more particularly interesting to that portion of the community to -whom the more refined researches of literature afford pleasure and instruction....
Page 447 - It is an unaffected, well-written record of a tour of some 36,000 miles, and Is accompanied by a number of very beautiful tinted lithographs, executed by the author. These, as well as the literary sketches in the volume, deal most largely with Southern and Spanish America,— whence the reader Is afterwards taken by Lima to the Sandwich Islands, is carried to and fro among the strange and...
Page 366 - Castlemaine being publique, every day, to his great reproach; and his favouring of none at Court so much as those that are the confidants of his pleasure, as Sir H. Bennet and Sir Charles Barkeley; which, good God! put it into his heart to mend, before he makes himself too much contemned by his people for it!
Page 13 - Home from my office to my Lord's lodgings where my wife had got ready a very fine dinner — viz. a dish of marrow bones ; a leg of mutton ; a loin of veal ; a dish of fowl, three pullets, and two dozen of larks all in a dish ; a great tart, a neat's tongue, a dish of anchovies ; a dish of prawns and cheese.
Page 430 - Now ready, in 1 vol. (comprising as much matter as twenty ordinary volumes), 38s. bound. The following is a List of the Principal Contents of this Standard Work: — I. A full and interesting history of each order of the English Nobility, showing its origin, rise, titles, immunities, privileges, &c.

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