Sitting for Equal Service: Lunch Counter Sit-Ins, United States, 1960s

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Twenty-First Century Books, Jul 1, 2010 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 160 pages
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"We were hoping [the sit-in] would catch on and it would spread throughout the country, but it went even beyond our wildest imagination."―Ezell Blair Jr., North Carolina Agricultural & Technical college student

On February 1, 1960, four black college students sat down at the whites-only lunch counter in a Woolworth's department store in Greensboro, North Carolina. The young men knew the waitress couldn't take their order because of the store's segregationist policies. But the young men hadn't come to eat―they had come to make a peaceful stand for equality.

At this time in the southern United States, a long-standing tradition of segregation prohibited blacks from sharing public spaces―schools, swimming pools, hotels, waiting rooms, bathrooms, and restaurants―with whites. The Greensboro students were inspired by previous sit-in protests, and they decided to sit at the lunch counter day after day, refusing to leave until they received service.

In this story of individual courage and determination, we'll see how the Greensboro sit-in ignited the fight for African American civil rights among thousands of fellow students―both black and white―and triggered sit-ins at segregated lunch counters throughout the South. We'll also learn how the sit-in spurred other group protests, such as the Freedom Rides, and how the protestors' efforts eventually led to the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, forbidding segregation in public facilities across the nation.
 

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Love it , has lots of interesting facts on the lunch counter sit-ins . Most definitely good for an research paper .

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Contents

Coffee Party
4
The Greensboro Four
6
Making Progress
20
Defending the Status Quo
36
Sitting Down at the Lunch Counter
50
An Explosive Encounter
66
Supporters and Opponents
82
Uniting Forces
100
Timeline
140
Whos Who?
142
Glossary
146
Source Notes
148
Selected Bibliography
150
Further Reading and Websites
152
Index
154
Photo Acknowledgments
160

Presidents and Politics
116
Learning to Live Together
136
Back Cover
162
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About the author (2010)

Melody Herr, PhD, is a historian and a writer.

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