Kant and the Limits of Autonomy

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Harvard University Press, 2009 - Philosophy - 444 pages
Autonomy for Kant is not just a synonym for the capacity to choose, whether simple or deliberative. It is what the word literally implies: the imposition of a law on one's own authority and out of one's own rational resources. In Kant and the Limits of Autonomy, Shell explores the limits of Kantian autonomy--both the force of its claims and the complications to which they give rise. Through a careful examination of major and minor works, Shell argues for the importance of attending to the difficulty inherent in autonomy and to the related resistance that in Kant's view autonomy necessarily provokes in us. Such attention yields new access to Kant's famous, and famously puzzling, Groundlaying of the Metaphysics of Morals. It also provides for a richer and more unified account of Kant's later political and moral works; and it highlights the pertinence of some significant but neglected early writings, including the recently published Lectures on Anthropology. Kant and the Limits of Autonomy is both a rigorous, philosophically and historically informed study of Kantian autonomy and an extended meditation on the foundation and limits of modern liberalism.
 

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Contents

Kants Early Theory of Freedom
17
Remarks in Observations Concerning
39
Rousseau Count Verri and the True Economy of Human
85
The Paradox of Autonomy
122
Late Kant 17891798
163
Moral Hesitation in Religion within the Boundaries
186
Volkerrecht in Toward Perpetual Peace
212
The Conflict of the Faculties Part One
248
Honor and History in The Conflict of
277
Kants Jewish Problem
306
The Limits of Autonomy
335
Notes
345
Index
423
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About the author (2009)

Susan Meld Shell is Professor of Political Science, Boston College.

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